The International Relations, Politics and Sociology programme held its Ninth Annual Postgraduate Day on 13 June 2014

Thursday, 17 July 2014

The International Relations, Politics and Sociology programme held its Ninth Annual Postgraduate Day on 13 June 2014

This was another stimulating and enjoyable event, which for the first time was held in the University’s new John Henry Brookes Building.

Members of academic staff were joined by the cohort from the MA programme in International Studies and the MA in International Law and International Relations. Prospective MA students were also present and they had the chance to meet and discuss our courses with staff and current students.

Guest lecture: ‘Is the past “dangerous”? Reclaiming destroyed space between 9/11, Utøya and the Bali bombing by Dr Charlotte Heath-Kelly.

Dr Charlotte Heath-Kelly from the University of Warwick. Her lecture provided a fascinating account of an ongoing research project that considers what happens to destroyed spaces after major incidents such as 9/11 and the massacre by Anders Breivik on Utøya Island, Norway.

She highlighted the political contestation over these spaces and how the over-riding compulsion is to rebuild them. This led to a broader discussion of the consequences these spaces have for how we understand security in relation to this desire to build memorials. Particularly interesting was the postscript to her presentation where she reminded the audience that in conducting this kind of research we are a long way from being objective and dispassionate researchers.

The programme is very grateful to Dr Heath-Kelly for her excellent contribution to the day.

Postgraduate panels

Current MA students gave short presentations on their summer dissertation projects. Four separate panels were organised allowing the students to outline their research topics and audience members to provide invaluable feedback.

The presentations covered a fascinating range of issues including:

  • ‘Global basic income dividend through emissions taxation - bridging sustainability and development’.
  • ‘Turning to, and from, the ICC: The case of Uganda’.
  • ‘To what extent are regional organisations 'locking-in' neoliberalism?’.
  • ‘South Sudan, Security politics and the LAPSSET project: A critical realist analysis of the Rentier state concept’.