BBC2 to re-air award-winning slow loris documentary

Wednesday, 02 November 2016

Wild Slow Loris

BBC2 will broadcast the award-winning Natural World documentary ‘Jungle Gremlins of Java’ on Saturday 5 November at 11.00am, about the under-threat slow loris primate.

The captivating and emotional film follows Oxford Brookes’ Professor Anna Nekaris as she explains why this fascinating species faces a threat to its existence due to the illegal pet-trade.

It is fantastic that the BBC are re-airing the Jungle Gremlins of Java documentary, particularly as we have just been campaigning on our annual Slow Loris Outreach Week, where we want to make people aware of the truth about these creatures and the illegal trade surrounding them.

Prof Anna Nekaris, Course Leader in Primate Conservation, Oxford Brookes University

The cute and docile appearance of the slow loris began to capture the hearts of millions across the world when a YouTube of a ‘pet’ loris being tickled went viral. Since then, more videos have appeared online that disguise the true nature of the loris and lead people to believe they make ideal yet exotic domestic pets.

Professor Anna Nekaris, course leader of Primate Conservation at Oxford Brookes University and Director of the Little Fireface Project said: “It is fantastic that the BBC are re-airing the Jungle Gremlins of Java documentary, particularly as we have just been campaigning on our annual Slow Loris Outreach Week, where we want to make people aware of the truth about these creatures and the illegal trade surrounding them.

“It is not obvious from social media videos that these primates are in fact a protected species and it is in all likelihood that the lorises featured in the videos have been caught in the wild, traded illegally and subjected to cruel treatment both in the markets and the homes to which they are eventually sold.

“During the Slow Loris Outreach Week, we want people to challenge the legality of any pet slow loris videos being circulated on the internet by spreading messages of conservation.”

More information about the slow loris and Oxford Brookes’ conservation work can be found on the Oxford Brookes website and the Little Fireface Project  website.