Cycle BOOM project reaches half way point and calls for participants

Tuesday, 16 June 2015

Raleigh cycle boom

The three-year Cycle BOOM research project being carried out by academics at Oxford Brookes has now reached the half-way point.

Cycle BOOM is a study which investigates cycling amongst the older population and how this affects independence, health and wellbeing.

So far, the project team has studied 120 participants aged 50 and over across three groups; those who have stopped cycling completely, those who have begun to cycle again and those who have continued to cycle into older age. 

We are currently looking for more people who don't cycle and don't want to start cycling as well as those who might be interested in starting

Dr Tim Jones, Senior Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University and Cycle BOOM project lead

At the end of the study, the project aims to be able to advise government policy makers about how infrastructure in towns and cities can be built and adapted to support cyclists and champion active ageing. 

The Cycle BOOM team is now looking for participants aged 50 plus living in the Blackbird Leys, Rose Hill and Barton areas of Oxford to take part in the study. A mix of people is needed for the study including those who no longer cycle to those who are still cycling. 

Dr Tim Jones Senior Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University and Cycle BOOM project lead said: “Our research is investigating how we can support cycling in older age and how this affects health and wellbeing. We are currently looking for more people who don't cycle and don't want to start cycling as well as those who might be interested in starting so please get in touch if this is you."

More information about the study, what’s involved and how to apply to take part can be found on the Cycle BOOM website

The video below details the findings of Cycle BOOM’s case studies which took place in two European ‘cycling cities’ in 2014. The team travelled to Seville and Munich to find out more about the infrastructure and technology available in these cities which has been put in place to allow more people to take up cycling. 

Image credit: Raleigh 2014