Oxford Brookes to host 4th annual Ken Hom Lecture

Friday, 09 September 2011


Award winning journalist, and presenter of BBC Radio 4's Food Programme, Sheila Dillon will deliver the fourth annual Ken Hom Lecture this month (28 September 2011).

Award winning journalist, and presenter of BBC Radio 4's Food Programme, Sheila Dillon, will deliver the fourth annual Ken Hom Lecture this month.

The lecture will take place at 7pm on Wednesday 28 September at Oxford Brookes University's Main Lecture Theatre.

The annual Ken Hom Lecture is part of a series of events hosted by Oxford Gastronomica, Oxford Brookes' specialist centre for the study of food, drink and culture. Internationally renowned chef and broadcaster Ken Hom is a founding Patron of the centre.

Sheila Dillon, who is also a Patron of Oxford Gastronomica, will be delivering a lecture entitled The Bollinger Bolsheviks versus the Foodies: How Journalists Helped Shape the British Diet.

Sheila, who has been a food journalist for almost three decades, began work as an editor and writer at the New York based magazine Food Monitor.

For 20 years, she has worked on the BBC Radio 4's flagship Food Programme, first as reporter, then producer and now presenter. Her investigative work has won many awards including the Glaxo Science Prize, Caroline Walker Award and several Glenfiddich Awards, most recently for her documentary on the history of the American meat industry.

Speaking ahead of the event, Sheila Dillon said: 'Few realise that the British food revolution was kicked off by socialist writers who hoped to democratise good taste and healthy eating. I will take this unique opportunity to reveal the immense influence of Britain's most accomplished food writers. At a time when the British diet is in crisis, it is worth considering how food media could actually be a force for good.'

Donald Sloan, Head of the Oxford School of Hospitality Management, and Chair of Oxford Gastronomica commented: 'Having observed the food industry at close quarters throughout her career, there is no-one better placed than Sheila Dillon to provide insights into what has shaped the British diet. In addition to her depth of knowledge, she is an outstanding communicator. This event is a must for those with a passion for food and drink.'

There is no charge to attend the lecture, but booking a place is essential.