Horse meat Scandal: First past the post(er)

Thursday, 27 February 2014

Helen Walkington, Adela Cragg and Robert Wilkes, History of Art

[caption id="attachment_4244" align="aligncenter" width="700"] Helen Walkington, Adela Cragg and Robert Wilkes, History of Art[/caption] This February will see Oxford Brookes represented at a Posters in Parliament event; an initiative that celebrates undergraduate research by allowing selected undergraduate students to present their research in Parliament. The annual event, first held last year, is attended by Members of Parliament and is also open to members of the public. Adela Cragg; a third year Geography and Anthropology student, representing Oxford Brookes Social Sciences department, presented the results of her undergraduate dissertation on the Tesco horse meat scandal of January 2013. The horse meat scandal was widely publicized and many people at the time were questioning how it would affect attitudes towards buying beef. For her dissertation, Adela investigated how the scandal had influenced the attitudes and buying habits of students, producing some surprising results! Of the 202 students questioned it was found that nearly 72% of them said that the horse meat controversy did not affect the type of beef they bought, with nearly 92% mentioning that it didn’t change where they bought their beef either. Helen Walkington, Principal Lecturer in Geograpghy and Student Experience says of the experience
Taking students to the Posters in Parliament event is just one way that Oxford Brookes supports undergraduate level research. Doing your own research is really encouraged within our undergraduate modules, and Brookes regularly hosts faculty conferences where undergraduates have the opportunity to present their research. Geography students also have the opportunity to get their work published in the Oxford Brookes’ run national Undergraduate Research Journal ‘Geoverse’.