5th International Conference in association with CAPRI, the internationalisation stream of the Centre for Social and Educational Research across the Life course (SERL). Conference hosted by Centre for Curriculum Internationalisation (CCI).

Theme: Global Citizenship as Personal and Pedagogical Practice

Date: Friday 7 June and Saturday 8 June 2013.

Venue: Harcourt Hill Campus, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford.

 

Conference videos

Mid-session plenary

Engagement for global and local citizenship

Paul Collins, Acting Keeper of Antiquities, Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, in conversation with Lyn Bibbings, Business Faculty.

Discussion about how Brookes and the Ashmolean Museum have independently approached introducing and developing Global Citizenship in their communities and the issues and similarities they have encountered.

 

Transnational panel discussion about the deeper issues related to global citizenship practices.

 


In association with CAPRI, the Centre for Curriculum Internationalisation (CCI) celebrates its 6th anniversary in 2013 with a conference on the theme of Global Citizenship as Personal and Pedagogical Practice. In the past decade, internationalisation of the curriculum in tertiary education has evolved as an area of empirical research and inquiry conducted within diverse theoretical frameworks. This work has also engaged students, teachers and other stakeholder groups in a dialogue which foregrounds the personal dimensions of teaching, learning and assessment practice and acknowledges the importance of personal and professional values.

Within the context of the internationalised curriculum the term ‘global citizenship’ is assuming currency as institutions in a complex, fast-changing, globalised world strive to define the attributes required to enable graduates to make a worthwhile contribution to society and economy. At the same time however, it is becoming apparent that educating global citizens suggests personal, reflexive engagement and both individual and collective negotiation in a context where everyday practitioners talk, write and act the institution into existence. In this conference we take the opportunity to reflect critically upon ourselves as university educators. We are particularly interested in the ways the concept of global citizenship is translated as a conceptual framework into collaborative and community practices, into identity and discourse practices, into everyday narratives, into institutional change, and ethical accounts of the self.