Brexit FAQs

  • (Last updated 5 November 2018)
    • Yes. There will be no change to the immigration status of EU students who are already here or who arrive before the end of the government’s Brexit implementation period on 31 December 2020. This was confirmed in the government’s Statement of Intent on the EU Settlement Scheme (n.b. the final details of the scheme are still subject to agreement by Parliament).

    • EU nationals who already live in the UK, or who arrive by 31 December 2020, will be able to apply for settled status. This will enable them to live, work and study in the UK for as long as they like. The settlement scheme will open fully in March 2019 and the deadline for applications will be 30 June 2021.

    • The government has also committed in its Brexit White Paper to “facilitating mobility for students and young people, enabling them to continue to benefit from world leading universities.” once the UK leaves the EU.

    • Universities, including Oxford Brookes, are calling on the government to use the upcoming Immigration Bill to ensure that future academic and student mobility is not impeded by unnecessary bureaucracy regardless of the immigration status of EU/EEA nationals after the UK has left the EU. However, the immigration status of EU citizens arriving in the UK after 31 December 2020 will depend on the kind of relationship the UK negotiates with the EU and the migration system that is established after withdrawal.

    • The government is in negotiations with governments of EEA countries (Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein) and Switzerland about the rights of their citizens. 

    • There will be no change to the tuition fee status of current EU students attending UK universities or for those coming for courses starting in 2018–19 or in 2019-20. This means that EU students studying at UK universities will pay the same fees as 'home' students for the full duration of their course, even if the course finishes after the UK has left the EU.

    • The fees that EU students starting courses at UK universities following the agreed transition period are required to pay will depend on what is agreed as part of the UK's exit negotiations.



    Existing EU/EEA students, and those applying for courses in 2018/19 and 2019/20

    • Separate statements from across all UK nations confirm that current EU students remain eligible to receive loans and/or grants to fund their studies for the full duration of their course. The same will apply to those students who start in 2019/20.

    • EU students attending universities in England who are eligible under current rules to receive loans and grants from their respective student finance organisations will continue to do so for the duration of their course, even if it only ends after the UK has left the EU. The guarantee for 2019/20 entrants has been confirmed

    EU/EEA students applying for a PhD starting in 2018/19

    • It was confirmed in a statement from Jo Johnson MP that EU nationals starting courses in the academic year 2017/18 will continue to be eligible for Research Council PhD studentships to help fund their studies for the full duration of their course. This will be the case even if the course finishes after the UK has left the European Union. This has now been extended to cover PhD studentships for 2018/19.

    • Students from UK universities currently participating in Erasmus+, including those taking part this academic year, will not be affected by the referendum result or the triggering of Article 50.

    • Following the UK-EU phase one agreement on the 15 December 2017, the UK will be able to participate in Erasmus+ until the end of the programme in 2020, providing there is a final exit deal agreed upon. This should allow staff and students to complete mobility periods, and receive funding, through the Erasmus+ programme until the end of the academic year 2020/21.

    • Universities, including Oxford Brookes, continue to highlight the benefits of the programme and will be urging the UK government to push for access onto the Erasmus+ successor programme, which will commence in 2021.



    • The UK will remain in the Horizon 2020 research programme and other EU funding programmes that are part of the multiannual financial framework (MFF) until the end of 2020, as confirmed by the UK-EU phase one agreement. This will allow for UK participants to continue to apply and use EU programmes until the end of its current inception.

    • This includes long-term projects that are to continue after Horizon 2020 has finished. The report published jointly by the UK and the EU on the phase one agreement stated that the UK's "eligibility to apply to participate in Union programmes and Union funding for UK participants and projects will be unaffected by the UK's withdrawal from the Union for the entire lifetime of such projects". In addition, the paper states that the UK could "agree to simplified procedures so as to avoid unnecessary administrative burdens extending well beyond the end of the current multiannual financial framework" ensuring that administration for this eventuality is being investigated.

    • Universities, including Oxford Brookes, are urging the government for full association for the next framework programme, Horizon Europe, which is due to start on 1 January 2021. The proposal for this programme was published by the European Commission in June 2018, and leaves open the possibility of full UK participation as an associated country.

    • In July 2018, it was announced that, even in a ‘no deal’ scenario, Horizon 2020 funding that is applied for after the UK leaves the EU would be guaranteed by the UK Treasury.
    • Yes. There will be no change to the immigration status of EU staff who are already here or who arrive before the end of the government’s Brexit implementation period on 31 December 2020. This was confirmed in the government’s Statement of Intent on the EU Settlement Scheme (n.b. the final details of the scheme are still subject to agreement by Parliament) and in the recent Brexit White Paper.

    • EU nationals who already live in the UK, or who arrive by 31 December 2020, will be able to apply for settled status. This will enable EU citizens to live, work and study in the UK for as long as they like, with the ability to leave the UK for up to five years without endangering their settled status. The settlement scheme will open fully in March 2019 and the deadline for applications will be 30 June 2021.

    • EU citizens who have already been in the UK for five years and can evidence that, will be granted settled status. EU citizens who have been in the UK for fewer than five years will be granted pre-settled status until they reach the five-year residency requirement. Those EU/EEA nationals with permanent residence will be able to convert their permanent residence status into the new settled status free of charge, subject only to verification of identity, a criminality and security check and proof of ongoing residence.

    • The Home Office has launched an official toolkit with step-by-step guides to support EU colleagues to understand the new EU Settlement Scheme and application process. The Settlement Scheme is subject to Parliamentary approval and further consultation is planned.

    • The government has also committed in its Brexit White Paper to ensuring that the post-Brexit immigration system “enhances the UK’s attractiveness for research, development and innovation”.

    • Universities, including Oxford Brookes, are calling on the government to use the upcoming Immigration Bill to ensure that future academic and student mobility is not impeded by unnecessary bureaucracy regardless of the immigration status of EU/EEA nationals after the UK has left the EU. However, the immigration status of EU citizens arriving in the UK after 31 December 2020 will depend on the kind of relationship the UK negotiates with the EU and the migration system that is established after withdrawal.

    • The government is in negotiations with governments of EEA countries (Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein) and Switzerland about the rights of their citizens.

    • Further information on the impact of Brexit on higher education employers is available from UCEA.


    • The fees and visa position for international students remains unchanged currently. This is likely to be the case until further information is received from the Government on any changes to policy. The University will continue to update with further information but it is important to stress that Oxford Brookes University remains an institution with a truly international outlook.
    • As a university, Oxford Brookes strongly believes that the diversity of its staff and student body, and the extent to which we collaborate with international colleagues, are signs of a successful, responsible and forward-thinking institution.

    • Colleagues in Human Resources are available to support staff wherever possible with questions or concerns about their employment following the EU Referendum. Contact details can be found on the HR webpages.

    • As part of its ongoing provision of support and information for colleagues, staff had the opportunity to join a open session in January 2017 on immigration law and EU nationals. This included a summary of the options available to EEA migrants and their family members who are here in the UK.

    • The Universities & Colleges Employers Association (UCEA) has also pulled together selected relevant resources which may also be helpful for EU staff. This includes third-party links on a range of issues including information for European Economic Area (EEA) nationals at universities, residency options for EEA staff already resident in the UK, Government statements, and employment implications.

    • You can print off your 2016 P60 from the Core HR staff portal direct yourself as well as your monthly payslips from May 2015 onwards. Regrettably we are unable to exactly re-produce P60s earlier than 2016; these are specifically produced legal documents. However our Payroll team can, with at least 30 calendar day’s notice, produce a letter which would contain historical P60 details for you. If you contact Payroll on finance-payroll@brookes.ac.uk then they will be able to assist you but please do give them as much notice as possible.
    • As above, you can print off your payslips from May 2015 onwards yourself. However if you would like payslips prior to that date then you can request this information from Payroll on finance-payroll@brookes.ac.uk but please allow at least 30 days notice.
    • Yes. HR will happily write a ‘to whom it may concern’ letter confirming the essential employment details that you will need to assist you in your application. If you contact your link HR team then they will be able to assist you with this request.
    • If you give Human Resources sufficient notice they will happily stamp historical payslips and copies of contractual documents as having been verified by us. Please do request this in advance with your link team though and with suitable notice. Please note that Human Resources cannot verify any documents that are not created by the University such as copies of utility bills or other papers. HR will verify contractual documents and payslips but regrettably no other documents.
    • The University will continue to engage with the Government through a variety of channels, and through organisations such as Universities UK and University Alliance, to help ensure that the best interests of students, staff, research and the institution more widely are put forward.

    • For example, Vice-Chancellor Professor Alistair Fitt was on the witness panel for the Education Committee’s first evidence session for the inquiry into Brexit and Higher Education on 11 January 2017. The session examined the overall risks and opportunities of exit from the EU and explored higher education’s top priorities for the negotiation. Further information can be found on the University’s news pages.

    • In September 2017, Vice-Chancellor Professor Alistair Fitt was interviewed by The Guardian about how Brexit is impacting on universities. The feature can be read online

    As UK and EU negotiations advance, we will endeavour to keep staff, students and potential applicants closely informed and will continue to update these FAQs. 

    • Universities UK also provide Brexit FAQs which can be found on their website.
    • The Home Office is testing the EU Settlement Scheme through a series of pilots ahead of the public launch. This second phase of the pilot starts on 15 November and runs until 21 December 2018 and covers employees in the higher education and health and social care sectors.
    • More detailed information on the pilot can be accessed here and as the Home Office releases more information it will be published on that page. There is also a Briefing Pack that the Home Office have produced for all applicants. 
    • Successful applicants will receive the same outcome as they would if they applied after the public launch, though earlier than the wider population. Family members who are not employed in the listed educational institutions for this pilot are not eligible to take part in this pilot but will be able to apply when the scheme goes live fully next year.
    • For any questions about your application in this pilot, contact the EU Settlement Scheme Resolution Centre. They can be called from within the UK on 0300 123 7379, or from outside of the UK on 020 3080 0010. Details of call charges can be found at www.gov.uk/call-charges
    • Part of the settled status application involves ID verification that utilises a downloadable app, which runs on Android devices. A number of staff who do not own such a device have asked if one can be made available and IT Services can indeed assist. Android devices will be made available to staff on each of our four main sites at the IT Services service desk. That service is available during opening hours of the service desk point. The process is that the user will be given a factory reset blank android phone; they will then log into the phone using their google account (required for Play Store); they will download the app from the Play Store and do the required scan as part of the settlement application and complete the process. Finally they will then watch as the service desk staff member factory resets the phone for the next user. You will not be able to take the phone away from the service desk and IT Services staff are on hand to help if you encounter problems. Please keep in mind that we have specific opening times for walk in service desks - details are available online. The last admittance for this service will be an hour before they close.