Paying tribute to our health care heroes on International Nurses’ Day

Tuesday, 12 May 2020

Oxford Brookes nursing students

Staff from across Oxford Brookes have joined together to thank the University’s fantastic nursing students, staff and alumni for their care, compassion and expertise on the front-line.

International Nurses’ Day is celebrated annually on 12 May and this year coincides with the 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale's birth.

Students and teaching staff are joining our graduate nurses and health care workers already on the front-line. All are drawing upon their skills, expertise and compassion in continuing to deliver the best possible care in these most challenging circumstances.

Professor Alistair Fitt, Vice-Chancellor

The University is immensely proud of its health and social care students, staff and graduates, including those who are playing a vital role in the response to the global pandemic.

More than 130 final-year nursing students have rallied to the call, and are working on the front-line at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford and in healthcare settings across Oxfordshire. A further 66 nursing students are at Swindon’s Great Western Hospital.

Alongside them, 30 student midwives and more than 80 health care students, including physiotherapists, occupational therapists and paramedics, have stepped forward. Final-year paramedic students are working as front-line workers with South Central Ambulance Service, while first and second-year students have stepped up as emergency care assistants and call takers.

Staff from the University and partner NHS Trusts have recorded tributes in the video below to thank those who are caring for patients in the region, across the country and around the world.

 

Sarah Quinn, a second-year Master's student in Adult Nursing at Oxford Brookes, has been writing poetry alongside her work during the Covid-19 outbreak. Sarah wrote and recorded a moving poem specially for International Nurses’ Day which can be viewed below.

 

Significant numbers of Oxford Brookes’ graduates are making a huge difference to the response to the global pandemic too. 

Just one example is alumna Su Chantry who now works as an Occupational Health Manager for the Williams Formula One team. Su studied Critical Care with Oxford Brookes and, as a registered nurse, has returned to the NHS to support the response to Covid-19. Read about Su’s move from the F1 front-row to the Covid front-line on our Observe webpages.  

Professor Alistair Fitt, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford Brookes University, commented: “I feel immensely proud of all those who have taken on new roles with the NHS. Their desire to play their part has been truly inspiring to see. Students and teaching staff are joining our graduate nurses and health care workers already on the front-line. All are drawing upon their skills, expertise and compassion in continuing to deliver the best possible care in these most challenging circumstances.”

Further information on the health and social care courses available at Oxford Brookes can be found on our Faculty of Health and Life Sciences webpages.