Performance of acclaimed ‘Borderline’ will round off human rights festival

Thursday, 15 March 2018

Borderline

A highly acclaimed play about the experiences of refugees and asylum seekers in the Calais Jungle will provide an inspirational end to this week’s Oxford Human Rights Festival.

In its 16th year the festival has taken place all this week at Oxford Brookes University (12-17 March) featuring a programme of films, performances, talks and workshops exploring the theme of identity.

Borderline is a satire of the Calais Jungle devised and performed by an ensemble of European and refugee artists who met while in the Calais camps.

It is directed by Sophie Besse of PSYCHEdelight Theatre Company, she commented: "We are very honoured to be invited to show Borderline at the Oxford Human Rights Festival. Our show is not only an artistic performance, behind it there is a real human adventure of European and refugee performers coming together through the ups and downs to share an important message.

Our show is not only an artistic performance, behind it there is a real human adventure of European and refugee performers coming together through the ups and downs to share an important message.

Director Sophie Besse, PYSCHEdelight Theatre Company

“Despite their differences, I would even say, thanks to their differences, to their various cultures, identities and languages, they created a beautiful ensemble. Our aim is to continue to tour Borderline as much as possible to raise awareness for those who are still suffering, whose human rights are violated.”

The performance will take place on Saturday (17 March) at 5.00pm in the Abercrombie Building on Headington Campus.

There are still plenty of events to enjoy before the festival draws to a close, including:

  • a screening of the film City of Joy in collaboration with the Oxford Brookes Documentary Club. The film tells the story of the first class of women at City of Joy, a transformational leadership community for women survivors of violence, located in Bukavu, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • a lunchtime seminar by Rev. Kate Harford, Ecumenical Chaplain at Oxford Brookes, who’ll be discussing gender, sexuality and the scriptures. This is one of a series of lunchtime seminars by University staff who’ve been showcasing their research and other work around the theme of identity.
  • a screening of the film Little Tibet with film maker Sonam Anja-Tsang who will be talking about his films and his journeys across this land rich in Tibetan culture.
  • a talk by UK based charity Souriyat Across Borders about their work with Syrian artists and children who are refugees in the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan. Their exhibition Tented Dreams is on display the University’s Glass Tank until 23 March.

Details on all the remaining events in the programme can be found on the website www.oxfordhumanrightsfestival.net

All events are open to all and take place at the University’s Headington Campus. The majority of the events are free however booking may be required for some.

The Oxford Human Rights Festival is organised by students from Oxford Brookes’ Development and Emergency Practice and Applied Architectural Design.