Remembering Alice’s Adventures at the Oxford School of Art

Thursday, 02 July 2015

Alice-150-book

As the city of Oxford celebrates Alice’s Day on Saturday (4 July), did you know Oxford Brookes University has its own unique links with the famous book which is adored around the world?

Alice Liddell was the inspiration for Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and was a student at the Oxford School of Art which went onto become Oxford Brookes University.

Her father Henry Liddell was Dean of Christ Church and one of the original supporters of the Oxford School of Art. He was a Vice President on the first committee to establish the school which helped to provide the working people of Oxford with a worthwhile education.

In a report in the Oxford Herald in October 1869, four years after the School of Art opened, Alice was listed as a prize-winner gaining an honourable mention in the President’s Prize category for her sketches from nature in watercolour or oil.

More articles on Oxford Brookes’ rich and diverse history can be found in the University’s anniversary publication Celebrating 150 Years which is available to read online.

Celebrating 150 years book

Alice’s Day is a yearly celebration of Alice in Wonderland coordinated by The Story Museum, Oxford. The 2015 celebration marks the 150th anniversary of the publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and a host of city-wide activities will be taking place to mark the occasion. Information and the programme of events can be found on the the Story Museum’s website.

It will be a particularly special weekend in Oxford with Alice’s Day on Saturday and the Cowley Road Carnival taking place on Sunday (5 July). Oxford Brookes is proud to be the lead sponsor of this year’s Cowley Road Carnival – find out more on the University’s newspages.

Flintlock Theatre portraying Alice Liddell

Image caption: Flintlock Theatre performed Educating Oxford on the 22 May to mark the University’s official 150th birthday and portrayed important figures from Oxford Brookes’ history such as Alice Liddell and Alexander Macdonald, the School of Art’s first principal (pictured above).