Survey shows 93 per cent of people willing to take part in clinical research

Monday, 23 May 2016

Clinical trials survey

A new survey has found that 93 per cent of people in the Thames Valley region (Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Oxfordshire and Milton Keynes) feel they could make a positive contribution to public health by taking part in clinical research.

The study, led by Professor Janine Dermody and Dr Robert van der Veen from the Department of Marketing at Oxford Brookes University, surveyed 506 local residents across the region. It was commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Clinical Research Network Thames Valley and South Midlands, the local research delivery arm of the NHS.

Questions were developed to identify local resident’s awareness of clinical research and their attitudes towards it and getting involved.

Professor Janine Dermody commented: "It can be a big challenge to gain public engagement. So it’s very encouraging to see this strong predisposition for important issues like the nation's health. Especially when we are being told Britons are becoming more cynical and self-orientated.

It’s very encouraging to see this strong predisposition for important issues like the nation's health.

Professor Janine Dermody

“I was astonished at how positive local residents are to taking part in clinical research - the NIHR and its Networks have obviously worked extremely hard to achieve this. I am looking forward to continue working with the NIHR Clinical Research Network on raising public awareness and understanding.”

Figures also show it’s estimated that more than 289,000 people across Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Milton Keynes have taken part in clinical research supported by the National Institute of Health Research, the research arm of the NHS, over the past 10 years. These ‘research heroes’ have helped pave the way for new, improved NHS treatments and services.

Clinical research helps the NHS identify the best interventions and treatments for patients, which have the potential to improve the lives of those affected now, and in the future.

Dr Andrew Protheroe, Clinical Co­Director of the NIHR Clinical Research Network, said: “These figures tell us that local people understand that taking part in clinical research studies makes patients, and the NHS, better. If you want to help, ask your doctor or nurse about taking part in research when you next use your local NHS.”

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) has transformed research in the NHS in the decade since it was established as the research arm of the NHS in April 2006. Over five million people across the country have taken part in healthcare research over the past decade, with 98 per cent of NHS trusts and 41 per cent of GP practices now actively engaged in clinical research.

The NHS constitution gives everyone the right to information about research they could participate in, as part of their everyday healthcare, and clinical research studies are running at every hospital trust in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Milton Keynes.

The NIHR OK to Ask campaign encourages people to speak to their doctor or nurse about research. For more information, visit the NIHR website.

To find out more about clinical research or sign up to the free online course Improving healthcarethrough clinical research.