Tea Time at Brookes

Monday, 09 March 2015

Brookes Tea launch

As part of the 150th anniversary, Oxford Brookes will be launching their celebration tea at an Alice in Wonderland themed tasting event in the Forum of the John Henry Brookes Building on Wednesday (11 March) at 3pm.

The tea been brewed by master tea taster Alex Probyn from Blends for Friends and selected by the Brookes student Tea Society.  Alex was tasked with blending a tea that encapsulated Brookes’ Guiding Principles. 

Alex and Blends for Friends have created a great tasting tea that will hopefully allow many others to enjoy our anniversary in a fresh and unique way

June Girvin, Pro-Vice Chancellor at Oxford Brookes University


Pro-Vice Chancellor June Girvin said: "Our John Henry anniversary ale was hugely popular when it launched at the end of last year but we wanted to offer something non-alcoholic to encourage even more people to take part in our 2015 celebrations.

"Alex and Blends for Friends have created a great tasting tea that will hopefully allow many others to enjoy our anniversary in a fresh and unique way"

The teas are available in two bespoke blends, Brookes Breakfast and Brookes Grey and are two classic blends with a twist which can be enjoyed by all, whether you like a stronger brew or something lighter and more delicate. 

The tea will be available to buy from the Colonnade shop at £4.95 per pack and will also be served in the Abercrombie Café on the Headington Campus.

The launch event is open for students, staff and all members of the public to attend and there is no charge for admission. 

More information about the 150th anniversary celebrations events, merchandise and our Guiding Principles can be found on the Oxford Brookes website. 

Did you know…

The real-life Alice, who inspired Lewis Carroll’s classic children’s stories, was the daughter of Henry Liddell the Dean of Christ Church, Oxford. Alice attended the Oxford School of Art in the 1860s and was listed as a prize winner for her sketches in watercolour and oils in the Oxford University Herald in 1869