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Rehabilitation

MSc / PGDip / PGCert

Department of Sport, Health Sciences and Social Work

This innovative and dynamic MSc course is appropriate for all health, social care and exercise professionals working with different patient or client groups, adults or children. 

It provides you with the opportunity to challenge and critically evaluate your multi-professional and uni-professional clinical expertise in order to respond to the current and future needs of rehabilitation. 

You will have opportunities to work with practitioners from different professions, different patient and client groups, and a variety of countries - providing diverse views of rehabilitation. 

Please note: the January start is only available to part-time Home / EU students.

Available start dates

January 2018 / September 2018 / January 2019 / September 2019

Teaching location

Headington Campus

Course length

  • Full time: MSc: 12 months
  • Part time: MSc: 24-36 months. For PGDip and PGCert, please contact the Programme Administrator. January entry is only available to part-time Home / EU students.

UCAS Postgraduate code

22524

For full application details, please see the 'How to apply / Entry requirements' section.

  • Working with the Centre for Rehabilitation provides a strong research focus and provides you with the opportunity to link your dissertation to your research.
  • The ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, WHO 2001) - a key framework used internationally to guide rehabilitation practice, research and policy - is used throughout the course. 
  • Modules within the programme have been developed with the Multiple Sclerosis Society and the ARNI (Action for Rehabilitation from Neurological Injury) Institute, involving service users and carers.
  • Our teaching team is multiprofessional, promoting interprofessional learning and teaching, and offering excellent opportunities for shared learning.
  • We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction and high employability.
  • There is an Academic Cultural Orientation Programme run by the Faculty for students whose first language is not English.

PG Cert Rehabilitation:

Rehabilitation: Application of the ICF (20 level 7 credits)

This module focuses on the WHO ICF Classifications (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: ICF, and the ICF for Children and Youth: ICF-CY). You will have the chance to critically examine these classifications in relation to other rehabilitation theories and models, and to examine personal, professional, cultural and international perspectives. Considering the implications of the ICF and the ICF-CY for rehabilitation practice is a key focus as well as critical appraisal of the evidence base underpinning these classifications and related theories and models. This module is undertaken as a combination of class-based and on-line learning. (Semester 1)

Physiological Bases to Musculoskeletal and Neurological Rehabilitation Practice (20 level 7 credits)
This module enables you to deepen your understanding of the application of the anatomical, physiological and pathophysiological bases underpinning either musculoskeletal or neurological rehabilitation. It will provide you with the opportunity to develop further understanding of the organisation and functioning of neuro-musculoskeletal structures and then to focus more specifically on either musculoskeletal or neurological practice. Core knowledge of these areas will be expanded providing a functional and clinical relevance to clinical reasoning. (Semester 1)
 
The Evidence Base of Rehabilitation Practice (20 level 7 credits)
This module gives you the opportunity to explore the evidence base for rehabilitation in depth, specifically relating to your clinical area of interest. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis of theoretical frameworks and paradigms underlying current rehabilitation practice, the implications for future developments in this field, and management of the complex issues embedded in patient care. You will be expected to critically evaluate current literature and reflect upon your clinical practice in relation to the available evidence. (Semester 1)
 
PG Diploma Neurological Rehabilitation Pathway and PG Diploma Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Pathway:
 
The PG Cert Rehabilitation modules, plus
Disability: Individual and Global Perspectives (Compulsory for Musculoskeletal and Neurological pathways; 20 level 7 credits)
This module facilitates student learning through seminars, discussion and coursework. These will critically explore definitions of disability and handicap; disability and civil rights; political, social, cultural, economic and technological environments that create or foster disability; psycho-social aspects; ethical and moral aspects; and the concepts of empowerment, enablement, advocacy, independence and rehabilitation in relationship to disability models. (Semester 2)
 
Rehabilitation Research Design and Methods (20 level 7 credits)
This module aims to advance your knowledge of rehabilitation research design and research methods. It provides an overview of methodologies and methods commonly used to advance rehabilitation practice. A focus of the module is on research training in different research methods used to explore aspects of rehabilitation practice. You will have the opportunity to attend practical sessions on conducting systematic literature reviews; analysing statistical data; collecting and analysing qualitative data; critiquing and appraising research evidence. (Semester 1)
 
One other acceptable module.
 
PG Diploma Exercise Rehabilitation Pathway:
 
The PG Cert Rehabilitation Modules, plus
Functional Recovery from Stroke (20 level 7 credits)
This module is a collaborative venture with the ARNI (Action for Rehabilitation from Neurological Injury) Institute. It will underpin knowledge of brain injury and rehabilitation with ARNI methodology for functional retraining strategies. Students who complete the course will be given accredited ARNI Instructor status (subject to regular ARNI CPD sessions). Clinical reasoning and safe effective practice will be developed in both the theoretical and clinical components of the course. (Semesters 1 and 2)
 
OR
 
Exercise Prescription for Neurological Conditions (Alternative compulsory for Exercise pathway; 20 level 7 credits)
This module aims to introduce you to the knowledge-based, clinical and practical skills necessary for planned and strategic management of this patient group in an exercise prescription setting. This is a REPS 4 accredited module. (Semesters 2 and 3)
 
Rehabilitation Research Design and Methods (20 level 7 credits)
This module aims to advance your knowledge of rehabilitation research design and research methods. It provides an overview of methodologies and methods commonly used to advance rehabilitation practice. A focus of the module is on research training in different research methods used to explore aspects of rehabilitation practice. You will have the opportunity to attend practical sessions on conducting systematic literature reviews; analysing statistical data; collecting and analysing qualitative data; critiquing and appraising research evidence. (Semester 1)
 
One other acceptable module
 
PG Diploma Posture Management Rehabilitation Pathway:
 
Prior to entry students must first complete the 60 credit course in Posture Management from the Oxford Centre for Enablement. Students then take:
 
Rehabilitation: Application of the ICF (20 level 7 credits)
This module focuses on the WHO ICF Classifications (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: ICF, and the ICF for Children and Youth: ICF-CY). You will have the chance to critically examine these classifications in relation to other rehabilitation theories and models, and to examine personal, professional, cultural and international perspectives. Considering the implications of the ICF and the ICF-CY for rehabilitation practice is a key focus as well as critical appraisal of the evidence base underpinning these classifications and related theories and models. This module is undertaken as a combination of class-based and on-line learning. (Semester 1)
 
Rehabilitation Research Design and Methods (20 level 7 credits)
This module aims to advance your knowledge of rehabilitation research design and research methods. It provides an overview of methodologies and methods commonly used to advance rehabilitation practice. A focus of the module is on research training in different research methods used to explore aspects of rehabilitation practice. You will have the opportunity to attend practical sessions on conducting systematic literature reviews; analysing statistical data; collecting and analysing qualitative data; critiquing and appraising research evidence. (Semester 1)
 
One other acceptable module
 
MSc in Neurological Rehabilitation, MSc Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, MSc Exercise Rehabilitation, MSc Posture Management Rehabilitation:
 
The MSc consists of the modules specified for the specific pathway PG Diploma, plus 
 
Rehabilitation Dissertation (60 credits at level 7)
Here you can explore in depth one particular substantive area in relation to your area of rehabilitation practice (Neurological, Musculoskeletal, Exercise or Posture Management), and at least one particular research design, which can involve primary data collection, use of secondary data, and systematic literature review. You will be allocated a dissertation supervisor to guide you through the dissertation. 
 
All of the compulsory modules for the specific pathways are acceptable modules to the other pathways. The following acceptable modules are also available:
 
Supporting People with Long Term Neurological Conditions (on-line learning; 20 level 7 credits)
Long-term neurological conditions such as Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s Disease or Motor Neurone Disease are the primary focus of this module. You will have the opportunity to centre your attention on the neurological condition you focus on in your practice. The ICF (WHO 2001) will be used as a framework for this module to enable a bio-psychosocial approach. This module has been developed with the Multiple Sclerosis Society with input from the Parkinson’s Society and the Motor Neurone Disease Society. (Semester 2)
 
Occupational Therapy: New Perspectives (on-line learning; 20 level 7 credits)
This module will enable you to develop your understanding of current perspectives informing contemporary occupational therapy practice. You will explore established and emerging theory and research in the areas of occupation and occupational performance. You will have the opportunity to further understand the evolving discipline of occupational science, considering the factors that contribute to the health and well-being of individuals, groups and communities from an occupational perspective. (Semester 1)
 
Advanced Communication and Supportive Relationships (20 level 7 credits)
This module explores verbal and non-verbal communication, and the development of supportive relationships, within the context of life-threatening illness. It aims to build on existing skills and develop them within your own area of practice. The module promotes a critical approach to sources of knowledge from nursing, health and social care and psychotherapy. Students need to be in practice or have worked recently in practice. (Semester 1)
 
Advanced Symptom Management (on-line learning; 20 level 7 credits)
This module focuses on the development of assessment and critical appraisal skills, and on the management of distressing symptoms in the context of life-threatening illness. Themes of the module centre on assessment, and an evaluation of the evidence base for interventions, all of which are explored in the context of clinical practice. The module recognises the unique nature of individual experiences of symptoms, and promotes care that responds to individual priorities. (Semester 2)
 
Independent Study (20 level 7 credits)
This module enables you to build on your existing knowledge and professional experience, and study in-depth an aspect related to your chosen programme of study. You choose your own area of interest and may carry out individual or group projects. You negotiate a contract with a tutor from the programme team who will provide you with learning support. (Semester 1, 2 or 3)
 
Work-Based Learning (20 level 7 credits)
This module enables you to gain recognition and academic credit for learning gained through professional practice or employment. You will be asked to develop a work based learning contract which specifies the learning outcomes to be achieved, the learning activities, resources required, and the evidence of achievement which will be assessed. The contract is negotiated between you, your workplace and a tutor from the programme team who will provide you with learning support.  (Semester 1, 2 or 3)
 
You may take any of the compulsory rehabilitation modules individually as part of your own continuing professional development. Please see the attached download on the right for a diagram of the pathways and CPD options.
 
Please note: as courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the list of modules may vary from that shown here.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment strategies are intended to promote an interprofessional, patient-centred and practice-focused approach to rehabilitation.

Opportunities for interprofessional learning - sharing existing and developing skills, knowledge and experience - are maximised through the use of  variety of teaching and learning strategies, including seminars, group work and case studies. All teaching, learning and specific assessments are focused on the individual and their rehabilitation programme. If you are not in practice, or not from a health care background, the sharing of knowledge and experience can be of particular value. 

Assessment methods used within the course are varied; they are designed to be stimulating as well as academically rigorous, and are based on your learning needs, individual aims, content, and the academic standards expected for the course. Assessment is based on coursework consisting of academic and reflective essays and case studies.

The course team is committed to providing flexibility, and is exploring ways of offering blended-learning approaches.

Examples of students taking the course or individual modules

  • Physiotherapist taking the Functional Recovery from Stroke module to develop their skills and knowledge around exercise and stroke.
  • Specialist MS nurse practitioner taking the Long Term Chronic Illness module and then crediting that towards the MSc Neurological Rehabilitation.
  • Exercise professional working in a gym taking the Exercise Prescription Module to obtain REPS 4 accreditation.

Programme changes

On rare occasions we may need to make changes to our course programmes after they have been published on the website. For more information, please visit our Changes to programmes page.

Tuition fees

Home/EU - full time fee: 2017/18: £1,000 per single module credit 2018/19: £1,000 per single module credit

Home/EU - part time fee: 2017/18: £1,000 per single module credit 2018/19: £1,000 per single module credit

International - full time: 2017/18: £13,500 2018/19: £13,770

International - part time fee : 2017/18: £1,460 per single module credit 2018/19: £1,490 per single module credit

Where part time fees are quoted there will be approximately a 2% increase on fees each year. For information there are 9 single modules to pay for in a full masters programme

Please be aware that some courses will involve some additional costs that are not covered by your fees. Specific additional costs for this course, if any, are detailed in the 'This course in detail' window above.

Questions about fees?
Contact Student Finance on:
+44 (0)1865 483088
finance-fees@brookes.ac.uk

Funding and scholarships

If you are a UK applicant you may be eligible for funding or sponsorship to undertake the course through your local strategic health authority, your employer, or another source (note: these sources are not open to international students). Self-funding applicants are also welcome to apply.

Entry requirements

  • A UK or overseas degree from a recognised institution, or an equivalent professional or other qualification preferably in a science subject 
  • Work or volunteer experience in the field would be an advantage

Please also see the university's general entry requirements.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English you must demonstrate that your level of English is appropriate for study at postgraduate level. This means you must have an IELTS score of 6.5 overall including 6.0 in reading and writing and 5.5 in listening and speaking or an acceptable qualification at an equivalent level such as the University English course at Oxford Brookes. 

Please also see the university's standard English language requirements

English requirements for visas

If you need a student visa to enter the UK you will need to meet the UK Visas and Immigration minimum language requirements as well as the university's requirements. Find out more about English language requirements.

International applications

Please note only the September start (full-time) is available to international students.

Preparation courses for International and EU students

We offer a range of courses to help you to meet the entry requirements for this course and also familiarise you with university life. You may also be able to apply for one student visa to cover both courses.

  • Take our Pre-Master's course to help you to meet both the English language and academic entry requirements for your master's course.
  • If you need to improve your English language, we have pre-sessional English language courses available to help you to meet the English language requirements of your chosen master’s.

If you are studying outside the UK, for more details about your specific country entry requirements, translated information, local contacts and programmes within your country, please have a look at our country pages.

How to apply

You apply for this course through UCAS Postgraduate.

Through UCAS Postgraduate, you should use the UKPASS portal to make your application, which will then be forwarded directly to our Admissions Office. You should send supporting documentation to us directly using the email addresses on the UKPASS application form.

Applications received electronically through UKPASS will be forwarded directly to the Admissions Administrator. Supporting documentation should be forwarded using the email addresses indicated on the UKPASS application form.

International applicants will:

  • need to apply early to allow enough time for obtaining visas if offered a place
  • be asked to pay a deposit of £1,000 to secure a place on the course.

Applications are dealt with on a first come, first served basis, so please act early to avoid disappointment.

Terms and Conditions of Enrolment

When you accept our offer, you agree to the Terms and Conditions of Enrolment. You should therefore read those conditions before accepting the offer.

How this course helps you develop

This course helps you to develop your own professional practice, enabling you to deal with rehabilitation issues using a critical problem-solving approach based on research and theoretical perspectives and models. This might enable you to move more into a leadership role or a specialist role.

Careers

Students who have graduated from the course have changed their jobs, for example going into rehabilitation leadership roles or specialist type roles, moving into specialist rehabilitation units or settings, or moving into education or research-type roles.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:

  • studying at a Brookes partner college
  • studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

How Brookes supports postgraduate students

All our courses adopt a student-centred approach to teaching and learning and are strongly focused on encouraging you to attain your full potential as lifelong learners.

There is a range of support mechanisms for students, such as academic advisers, who will facilitate your academic development, and student support co-ordinators, who provide a drop-in service for queries about any aspect of student life, covering both academic and personal welfare.

The university’s support services include Upgrade, which provides advice on study skills such as planning and writing essays, assignments and dissertations, research, or preparing for an exam. They also give advice on statistics and maths. There is a dedicated Student Disability and Dyslexia Service, which provides support for students with disabilities including sensory and mobility impairments, dyslexia and other specific learning difficulties, mental health problems and medical conditions. Here, staff offer advice and support on a range of issues, including physical access, funding, alternative assessment arrangements and liaison with teaching staff to ensure that they are aware of your requirements.

EU/International students

As a new EU or international student you will join the Academic and Cultural Orientation Programme, which has been set up to enable you to make a smooth transition into study at the University. Within the sessions, you will explore the culture of the University, which will assist you in developing the appropriate academic skills required for your programme of study. We also provide a comprehensive range of support networks and services to EU/international students. For more information, go to www.brookes.ac.uk/international/support-and-advice.

Supporting your learning

From academic advisers and support co-ordinators to specialist subject librarians and other learning support staff, we want to ensure that you get the best out of your studies.

Personal support services

We want your time at Brookes to be as enjoyable and successful as possible. That's why we provide all the facilities you need to be relaxed, happy and healthy throughout your studies.

Research highlights

The Centre for Rehabilitation within the Department of Sport and Health Sciences has strong leadership in the director, Professor Helen Dawes. The Centre brings together research, education and care. It is underpinned by a strong, well-published research group, the Movement Science Group, along with clinical expertise, rehabilitation, knowledge and care of adults and children with neurological conditions. Within the Centre, staff, students and alumni across the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences are engaged in a number of research projects.

Further details can be found at the Centre for Rehabilitation website and the web pages for members of the teaching team: