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English Language and Linguistics

BA (Hons)

Key facts


UCAS code

Q100

Start dates

September 2020 / September 2021

Location

Harcourt Hill

Course length

Full time: 3 years

Part time: up to 6 years

Department

School of Education

UCAS Tariff Points

104

Overview


If you want to understand language use in today’s globalized world, our English Language and Linguistics is the course for you.

You will look at:

  • the relationship between language and identity in terms of gender, ethnicity, religion and sexuality
  • how we change the language we use according to social contexts
  • intercultural communication
  • the use of language and non-verbal communication in areas such as journalism, advertising and public relations.

You will also:

  • examine how children and adults learn language and become adept users of it
  • learn about the history of the English Language and how (and why) it has changed over time
  • explore how sounds are produced and how words are structured and created
  • discover how language analysis can assist in solving crime
  • learn about the relationship between language and thought and how language is processed in the brain.

This degree is ideal preparation for careers in:

  • education
  • the media
  • public relations
  • tourism
  • hospitality
  • marketing
  • advertising.
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Combine this course


You can study this course as part of a combined honours degree. This course can be combined with:

How to apply


Wherever possible we make our conditional offers using the UCAS Tariff. The combination of A-level grades listed here would be just one way of achieving the UCAS Tariff points for this course.

Standard offer

UCAS Tariff Points: 104

A Level: BCC

IB Points: 29

BTEC: DMM

Contextual offer

UCAS Tariff Points: 88

A Level: CCD

IB Points: 27

BTEC: MMM

Further offer details

If you accept a Conditional offer to this course as your Firm choice through UCAS, and the offer does not include a requirement to pass an English language test or improve your English language, we may be able to make the offer Unconditional. Please check your offer carefully where this will be confirmed for each applicant.

For combined honours, normally the offer will lie between the offers quoted for each subject.

Applications are also welcomed for consideration from applicants with European qualifications, international qualifications or recognised foundation courses. For advice on eligibility please contact Admissions: admissions@brookes.ac.uk

Entry requirements

Specific entry requirements

GCSE: English Language at grade 4 or above

Please also see the University's general entry requirements.

English language requirements

Please see the University's standard English language requirements.

International qualifications and equivalences

Go

English requirements for visas

If you need a student visa to enter the UK you will need to meet the UK Visas and Immigration minimum language requirements as well as the University's requirements. Find out more about English language requirements.

Pathways courses for international and EU students

If you do not meet the entry requirements for this degree, or if you would like more preparation before you start, you can take an international foundation course. Once you enrol, you will have a guaranteed pathway to this degree if you pass your foundation course with the required grades.

If you only need to meet the language requirements, you can take our pre-sessional English course. You will develop key language and study skills for academic success and you will not need to take an external language test to progress to your degree.

Terms and Conditions of Enrolment

When you accept our offer, you agree to the Terms and Conditions of Enrolment. You should therefore read those conditions before accepting the offer.

Credit transfer

Many of our courses consider applications for entry with credit for prior learning. Each application is individually assessed by our credit entry tutors. 

If you would like more information about whether or not you may be eligible for the award of credit, for example from an HND, partly-completed degree or foundation degree, please contact our Admissions team.

We operate the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). All undergraduate single modules are equivalent to 7.5 ECTS credits and double modules to 15 ECTS credits. More about ECTS credits.

Application process

Full time Home / EU applicants

Apply through UCAS

Part time Home / EU applicants

Apply direct to the University

International applicants

Apply direct to the University

Full time applicants can also apply through UCAS

Tuition fees


Please see the fees note
Home/EU full time
£9,250

Home/EU part time
£1,155 per single module

International full time
£13,900

Home (UK) full time
£9,250 (subject to confirmation, September 2020)

Home (UK) part time
£1,155 per single module (subject to confirmation, Sept 20)

International / EU full time
£14,500

Questions about fees?

Contact Student Finance on:

Tuition fees


2020 / 21
Home/EU full time
£9,250

Home/EU part time
£1,155 per single module

International full time
£13,900

2021 / 22
Home (UK) full time
£9,250 (subject to confirmation, September 2020)

Home (UK) part time
£1,155 per single module (subject to confirmation, Sept 20)

International / EU full time
£14,500

Questions about fees?

Contact Student Finance on:
+44 (0)1865 483088

Please note tuition fees for Home/EU students may increase in subsequent years both for new and continuing students in line with an inflationary amount determined by government. Tuition fees for International students may increase in subsequent years both for new and continuing students.

Oxford Brookes University intends to maintain its fees for new and returning home and EU students at the maximum permitted level.

Financial support and scholarships

For general sources of financial support, see our Fees and funding pages.

Additional costs

Please be aware that some courses will involve some additional costs that are not covered by your fees. Specific additional costs for this course, if any, are detailed below.

We do not expect students to purchase any compulsory course books, as they are all available in the library. If students wish to purchase additional books to supplement their reading this is at their own discretion.

Learning and assessment


This course is based around four strands of study:

  • Cognitive Linguistics
  • Psycholinguistics 
  • Language Learning
  • Teaching.

Focusing on Applied Linguistics, two key themes of the course are:

  • Education - how we acquire language (as individuals and as a species) and the learning and teaching of language.
  • Persuasive discourses - critical study of the use of language in areas such as Journalism, Advertising, Public Relations and Media Formats.

In Year 1 you'll take core introductory modules to give you a good grounding in the four key strands and research in Applied Linguistics.

In Years 2 and 3 you'll research particular areas and issues in more detail, and develop your understanding of research in language in preparation for your dissertation in Year 3.

Students sitting around table listening to the tutor

Study modules

Year 1

Compulsory modules

Understanding Language 1: History, Sound and Structure

This module introduces students to the key concepts in English Linguistics and familiarises them with terminology and current debates in the field. The course aims to develop students’ analysis and discussion skills through practical analyses of experimental and language data in the lectures as well as in assessments. Some of the areas you will study include the history of the English Language, phonetics and phonology, and the structure of words. 

You'll also explore methodologies used in language acquisition research, with opportunities to improve your presentation, discussion and academic writing skills.

Understanding Language 2: System and Use

In this module, you’ll get to grips with key concepts of language. You’ll look at language as a system, and how we use it in different contexts of communication. You’ll understand language and its associated terms and definitions. You’ll gain core linguistic skills, as you explore linguistic analysis in areas of language such as:

  • sound (phonetics and phonology)
  • language as meaning (semantics)
  • language as structure (syntax).

You will explore these concepts through the study of written and spoken language in context.

Introduction to Discourse Analysis

In this module, you’ll gain a strong understanding of Discourse Analysis (the study of written and spoken language in its social context). You’ll gain key knowledge for Years 2 and 3 of your degree as you get to grips with the principles of Discourse Analysis. You will:

  • analyse language in the context of crime investigation (Forensic Linguistics)
  • explore how culture shapes our use of language (Intercultural Communication)
  • look at the different ways we communicate beyond language (Multimodal Communication) 
  • look at the relationship between language and power (Critical Language Studies)
  • Explore how we interact in conversations (Conversation Analysis)

You’ll understand the key theories of these areas of study. You’ll also gain key analytical skills, as you apply them to real-world scenarios. 

Sociolinguistics

What is the effect of society on language use? In this module, you’ll get to grips with Sociolinguistics and its core areas, including:

  • language and gender
  • language and age 
  • language and ethnicity
  • code-switching

You’ll gain core linguistic knowledge and refer to a wide range of geographic contexts, as you draw from studies on*: 

  • diglossia (when two dialects are used in a community)
  • bidialectism (using two dialects of the same language)
  • multi-dialectalism (using multiple dialects of the same language)
  • bilingualism (ability to speak two languages)
  • plurilingualism (ability to speak multiple languages and switch between them depending on the situation). 

Please note that the above listing may vary depending on the academic leading the module. Details will be confirmed during the academic year. 

Introduction to Applied Linguistics

In this module, you’ll gain the key tools you need for your degree, allowing you to excel in the rich field of English Language and Linguistics. In each session, you’ll gain valuable skills in academic writing, unlocking your potential to succeed in your studies. You’ll also be introduced to the key areas in the field of Applied Linguistics.   

Language Acquisition

From baby talk to babbling, how do we acquire language from a young age? In this module, you’ll get to grips with language acquisition and its core areas, including how infants process language, and how we may learn more than one language. You’ll dive into debates on language acquisition and development. You’ll also gain core analytical skills, as you use linguistic evidence to advance theories of language acquisition and development.

Optional modules

Theory of Knowledge

What does it mean to know something? Is knowledge different from mere belief? And is knowledge actually possible?

In this module, you’ll get to know the great thinkers of the past, and explore what they say about knowledge. You’ll explore the minds of:

  • Plato 
  • Descartes
  • Hume
  • Locke
  • Berkeley.

You also focus on key debates about knowledge today. You’ll gain fantastic analytical skills as you consider:

  • the meaning of perception 
  • if we can know something through hearsay 
  • if we can know the world beyond our minds 
  • if there can be a scientific account of knowledge.

Creative Writing (Introduction)

In this module, you’ll enhance your power and ability as a creative writer. You’ll attend workshops where you’ll learn through reading, writing, discussion and feedback. You’ll practise your own writing, explore the interplay of creativity and craft, and analyse how you work as a writer. You’ll join other students to explore key approaches in prose, poetry and script writing, through:

  • practical writing exercises 
  • discussing each-other’s work
  • critically analysing the work of published writers
  • exploring key writing practices. 

You’ll produce a portfolio of original creative writing, as well as a study of the aims and processes of your creative work. You’ll develop excellent writing habits, and the ability to reflect on your own writing practices. You’ll also understand the literary and cultural context of your own writing.
 

Understanding Culture

What do we mean when we talk about ‘culture’? How do human ideas, customs and behaviours become a way of life? In this module, we’ll investigate the key theories and concepts of culture. You’ll gain invaluable critical skills as you reflect on different aspects of culture. And you’ll explore the impact of modern culture on individuals and society today. 

You’ll explore cultural artefacts and activities. And you’ll look at how culture relates to identity, power and representation.

Year 2

Compulsory modules

Analysing English

In this module, you’ll gain core knowledge for your degree, as you get to grips with a Systemic-Functional model of language. This looks at the linguistic choices we make depending on the context.  You’ll consider the Systematic-Functional model as a key way to analyse spoken and written texts. You’ll investigate the relationship between society, culture and language through texts in many different contexts. 

Critical Linguistics

In this module, you’ll study the relationship between language and power and how this appears in, for example, the media. You’ll explore how power and dominant ways of thinking in society are reinforced in popular culture, and how journalists report current affairs. You’ll meet movements of social resistance, from Hip Hop culture to Carnival, and you’ll analyse their rejection of these dominant norms through language and representation. You’ll gain core skills for your degree, as you understand the debates around Critical Language Studies, and apply them to real-world texts.

Language and the Mind

In this module, you’ll explore the relationship between language and the mind. You’ll get to grips with key issues in cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics. You’ll gain core skills for your degree, as you understand the methods researchers use to analyse these fields. You’ll explore a number of topics, including: 

  • non-literal language processing
  • language development in infancy and early childhood
  • cognitive processing in reading 
  • the neural bases of bilingualism 
  • cognitive processing of sign language

You’ll also explore real-life studies from a wide range of contexts. 

Research Methods

In this module, you’ll gain core research skills, allowing you to succeed in your degree and in writing your dissertation. You’ll study quantitative (the statistical analysis of data) and qualitative (interviewing people and considering human experiences) research methods. You’ll get to grips with a range of research tools and approaches, and understand how to do appropriate data analysis. You’ll also gain a sensitivity to ethical issues, and how to apply all of the above in the writing of your 3rd year dissertation project.    

Optional modules

Creative Writing

In this module, you’ll enhance your power and ability as a creative writer. You’ll attend workshops where you’ll learn through reading, writing, discussion and feedback. You’ll practise your own writing, explore the interplay of creativity and craft, and analyse how you work as a writer. You’ll join other students in exploring key approaches in poetry and prose, through:

  • practical writing exercises 
  • discussing each-other’s work
  • critically analysing the work of published writers
  • exploring key writing practices. 

You’ll produce a portfolio of original creative writing, as well as a study of the aims and processes of your creative work. You’ll develop excellent writing habits, and the ability to reflect on your own writing practices. You’ll also understand the literary and cultural context of your own writing. 

Psychology and Education

In this module, you’ll get to grips with the thinking of major psychologists on human learning - from babies to adults You’ll look at the learner in context, considering their learning environment, and factors such as motivation and different types of intelligence. You’ll also consider teaching and learning styles, and understand the importance of self-esteem in the learning process. 

Language, Culture and Globalization (also available in year 3)

In this module, you’ll explore the relationship between language, culture and globalization. You’ll gain key analytical skills as you observe how language operates in local and global contexts. You’ll look at language through a sociolinguistic approach - considering the relationship between language and society and how they affect each other. You’ll explore how English rose to become an international language, spoken in countries all over the world. You’ll explore a range of topics, including: 

  • language and gender
  • language and politics
  • language and standardisation 
  • globalisation discourses
  • linguistic imperialism (when we impose our language on speakers of another language).

Persuasive Communication (also available in year 3)

How can the skills in persuasive speaking (rhetorics) help us understand and solve cultural problems? In this module, you’ll gain invaluable speaking and writing skills for your future career. You’ll also understand key rhetorical practices and how they affect society. You’ll explore the rhetorical tools likely to produce social change. You’ll put these to use, crafting persuasive messages that are:

  • Clear
  • Attractive
  • Well-crafted
  • Ethical.

You’ll become a skilled writer and speaker, able to take into account your audience, message and genre as you craft persuasive language.  

English Language Teaching to Adults (also available in year 3)

Do you dream of working as an English language teacher? Do you want to help adult learners grasp the English language? In this module, you’ll get to grips with English language teaching. You’ll gain a strong knowledge of teaching English, and essential skills in effective language teaching. You’ll also develop key practical skills for teaching English to adult learners. If you take this course, you’ll be able to apply to British Study Centres, Oxford to undertake  your teaching practice, and acquire a Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults (CELTA). This is recognised by Cambridge Assessment as a pre-service training qualification.

Intercultural Communication (also available in year 3)

In this module, you’ll get to grips with intercultural identity (connections between cultures) and intracultural identity (connections between people of the same culture). You’ll gain core ethnographic knowledge for your degree, meaning you’ll gain a strong awareness of how to study people and their cultures. You’ll dig into the philosophical foundations of Critical Theory. You’ll also gain strong self-awareness, as you analyse your own cultural traditions and norms. You’ll explore the dimensions of your own identity, and develop sensitivity to seeing the world as others see it.

Independent Study (also available in year 3)

This module gives you the chance to do research on a topic that fascinates you. You’ll work independently, honing your self-discipline skills and motivation,  You’ll have the support of our expert English Language and Linguistics lecturers as you carry out work on a specific project of your choosing. You’ll gain core skills for work, including in:

  • enquiry
  • research 
  • analysis 
  • evaluation. 

Work and community-related learning (also available in year 3)

This module gives you the chance to reflect on learnings gained from activities in work or community-related and extra-curricular settings. You’ll gain both personally and academically from your work experiences and community context, and you’ll engage in self-directed learning with appropriate academic supervision and structured reflection.

Stylistics (also available in year 3)

This portfolio module is designed to contain a number of possible optional courses which will change from year to year as staffing, teaching interests and curriculum coherence dictate. The Level 5 Special Topic modules approach literary study through common study paradigms: period; theme; generic; and stylistic analysis. Each provides a range of options with a common disciplinary methodology to enable students to specialise in particular in areas of study. All options on this Stylistics Focus module will emerge from staff teaching and research specialisms and will offer students concentrated study on a more focused range of ideas and issues than are covered in the Alternative Compulsory core modules. When selecting this module please see the module lead to discuss which topic option you will take.

Year 3

Compulsory modules

Subject to Discourse: Language and Literacies

In this module, you’ll gain core critical skills, as you analyse texts that you come across in your day-to-day life. You’ll have the chance to apply the theories and frameworks you’ve learned in your English Language and Linguistics degree, expanding your knowledge of language, putting you in a great position to succeed in your assessments.

Research Project / Dissertation

This module gives you the chance to do research on a topic that fascinates you. You’ll gain core critical skills as you dive into a specific topic in English Language and Linguistics. Previous dissertation topics have included: the representation of gender in Hip hop videos; an analysis of male and female Death Row Statements; the use of swearing on Facebook; the use of teasing in 'Celebs Go Dating'; how the mental lexicon is accessed; the use of metaphor in pop music lyrics.

Optional modules

Analysing Spoken Discourse

In this module, you’ll gain valuable critical skills as you analyse how we actually interact in conversation. You’ll get to grips with the transcription of spoken language and you’ll use a Conversation Analysis model (CA) as a way to explore the ‘rules’ underlying conversation. You’ll gain strong knowledge and skills in applying description and analysis and you’ll analyse talk in the media, business and legal settings, amongst others.

Forensic Linguistics

How can we use our knowledge of language to assist in the solving of crime? In this module, you’ll get to grips with forensic linguistics - the study of texts in criminal contexts. You’ll gain core analytical skills as you apply linguistic analysis to everything from language as evidence (such as emails, text messages and ransom notes), to police interviews and the use of language in law courts.

Independent Study

This module gives you the chance to do research on a topic that fascinates you. You’ll work independently, with the support of our expert academic team, and will carry out work on a specific project of your choosing. You’ll gain core skills for work, including in:

  • enquiry
  • research 
  • analysis 
  • evaluation.

Language and Identities

In this module, you’ll dive into issues of language and identity. You’ll explore identity markers, including: 

  • social class
  • age
  • gender
  • sexuality
  • ethnicity
  • religion. 

You’ll gain core analytical skills for your degree, as you analyse these identities and how these play out in face-to-face and virtual interactions, and oral and written communication, including media and classrooms. You’ll enrich your perspective and develop your ideas as you discuss theories and real-life studies around identity and language with your lecturer and fellow students. You’ll look at the ethical guidelines designed for research on language and identity, as you collect and analyse data. You’ll understand historical discussions on language and identity through issues that are personally relevant to you.

Language Teaching: Learning and Creativity

In this module, you’ll explore approaches to language learning and teaching, as well as theories of creativity, both inside and outside language learning contexts. You’ll be exposed to different ways of teaching reading, writing, speaking and listening. You’ll also discover approaches to creativity in language students, and how teaching resources - such as course books and tests - impact learning.

Educational Sociolinguistics

How do we address linguistic variation within education? In this module, you’ll explore issues such as: 

  • transnationalism (how people connect across nations)
  • transmigration (the movement of people)
  • multilingual and multicultural development

and how these relate to education. You’ll dig into topics such as: 

  • appropriate pedagogies
  • language-teacher training
  • parental and community involvement for effective education
  • appropriate assessment of bilinguals
  • language-education planning.

Psycholinguistics

How do infants acquire their first language? How do young and adult learners acquire a foreign language, and how do they use it? In this module, you’ll get to grips with psycholinguistics - the study of language and the mind. You’ll explore fascinating issues around how we process language, the language skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening and the role of memory, as well as conditions such as dyslexia and aphasia (difficulty in producing or understanding speech).

Special Topics in English Language and Linguistics

This module intends to offer students an opportunity to engage in depth with issues in Applied Linguistics that are the subject of current scholarly and popular interest. Conducted predominantly through student-led discussions and seminar or workshop sessions, it enables students to develop more fully their portfolio in the Research strand of the programme. The specific contents of the module will be selected yearly to match current open questions in the disciplinary context. They will provide a platform for research-led reflection on the state on the discipline, and on related contemporary issues of political, social and cultural significance. Students will engage with the readings through response papers and Socratic dialogue, as well as mutually assessing their seminar presentations.

Work and Community- Related Learning

This module gives you the chance to reflect on learnings gained from activities in work or community-related and extra-curricular settings. You’ll gain both personally and academically from your work experiences and community context, and you’ll engage in self-directed learning with appropriate academic supervision and structured reflection.

Work placements

Optional modules

Work placements

There are opportunities for students to undertake work experience in areas such as Public Relations. Work experience can be organised by the student or in conjunction with the university. Students will have to pay for any travel costs to attend work experience.

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the modules you can choose from may vary from that shown here. The structure of the course may also mean some modules are not available to you.

Learning and teaching

Participation and discussion are important features of the English Language and Linguistics course. We believe people learn more effectively this way.

Most modules combine lectures and seminar-style discussion based on weekly readings. You'll have the chance to discuss and challenge a wide variety of critical views and perspectives in your seminars.

  • Lectures and seminars
  • Placement
  • Other learning activities (including group work, research, conferences etc.)

Year 1

  • Lectures and seminars - 16%
  • Placement - 0%
  • Other learning activities (including group work, research, conferences etc.) - 84%

Year 2

  • Lectures and seminars - 17%
  • Placement - 0%
  • Other learning activities (including group work, research, conferences etc.) - 83%

Year 3

  • Lectures and seminars - 12%
  • Placement - 0%
  • Other learning activities (including group work, research, conferences etc.) - 88%

Learning and teaching percentages are indicative. There may be slight year-on-year variations.

Field trips

We are always keen to explore ways in which you broaden your experience of education and development. In the past we have visited The Gambia developing long standing relationships with schools and colleges and we are actively exploring international opportunities in other parts of the world, aiming to be responsive to students' needs and interests.

Please note that field trips are optional and an additional cost on top of course fees. The approximate cost for the Gambia trip in 2018 was £1200.

Assessment

Assessment methods used on this course

Assessment is based on coursework and takes a range of forms, including:

  • written classroom tasks
  • essays
  • group projects
  • seminar presentations
  • analyses of texts.

In your final year you write a dissertation on a subject of your choice (in consultation with your supervisor). There is a wide range of dissertation topics, previous topics have included:

  • discussion of Hip Hop videos
  • the language of twitter feeds
  • parent, child interaction
  • celebrity Facebook home pages
  • death row statements.
  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams

Year 1

  • Written exams - 0%
  • Coursework - 100%
  • Practical exams - 0%

Year 2

  • Written exams - 0%
  • Coursework - 100%
  • Practical exams - 0%

Year 3

  • Written exams - 0%
  • Coursework - 100%
  • Practical exams - 0%

Assessment method percentages are indicative. There may be slight year-on-year variations.

Study Abroad


You may be able to go on a European or international study exchange while you are at Brookes. Although we will help as much as we can with your plans, ultimately you are responsible for organising and funding this study abroad.

After you graduate


Career prospects

Graduates in English Language and Linguistics can choose from a wide range of career paths, particularly where an international dimension might be involved.

Due to an increasingly globalised world, our working lives become ever more cross-cultural in nature as we communicate and interact with people across cultures as well as across geographical borders.

If you have an interest in people, cultures and human diversity, relevant employment sectors might include teaching, both in the UK and internationally, tourism, marketing, the media, public relations, law, and international companies and organisations.

Jobs now being undertaken by recent course graduates include:

  • TEFL teaching in South America
  • working in broadcast Media (BBC and ITV)
  • online publishing
  • academic publishing
  • digital marketing
  • BBC Radio Producer
  • Journalist (Times Online)
  • retail manager
  • event manager
  • speech therapist
  • primary and secondary teachers
  • social media
  • content producer
  • advertising industry roles
  • copy writing
  • charity sector roles

Every year we run an alumni event where you will have the opportunity to meet recent graduates working in a variety of professions.

Further study

Students have gone on to apply for a range of master's courses such as Forensic Linguistics, Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition, TESOL, PGCE Primary and Secondary, and International Relations. A recent graduate is currently studying for a PhD in Forensic Linguistics. Find out more about Postgraduate courses at Brookes.

Student profiles


Our Staff


Dr Chris Rizza

Chris has extensive experience in teaching English as a foreign language, working in Italy, Japan and Brazil, as well as in schools in the UK.

Read more about Chris

Free language courses


Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

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Full-time study

Part-time study

Programme Changes: On rare occasions we may need to make changes to our course programmes after they have been published on the website.

For more information, please visit our Changes to programmes page.