Information literacy as a Brookes graduate attribute

  • Brookes graduates can ...

    • identify research needs by establishing gaps in their knowledge
    • investigate likely sources of appropriate information available to them
    • make informed decisions about the type and level of information needed
    • recognise the need to use varied and good quality information
    • understand how different types of search tools work; eg library catalogues, specialist databases, Web search engines
    • search systematically across a range of resources
    • construct effective searches by identifying and combining appropriate keywords
    • learn how to use specific search tools eg by reading help pages, manuals or search guides, and consulting appropriate professionals
    • support ongoing research and professional needs by using current awareness services
    • recognise and deal with the problems of too much or too little information
    • compare and critically assess the authority, currency, detail, and relevancy of information
    • recognise bias in information, especially from freely available web sources
    • take appropriate notes, summarise and adapt information for a new audience
    • synthesise information from different sources to present a reasoned argument
    • create new information through integrating their own knowledge and understanding with prior reading and research
    • understand academic and professional ethics eg. appropriate acknowledgement of sources, correct citation practices, and avoidance of plagiarism
    • continue professional development by keeping up to date, sharing and debating information through appropriate communication tools
  • Academic Liaison Librarians can ...

    • Underpin students’ acquisition of these Graduate Attributes throughout their time at Brookes, as the University’s professional experts in developing information literacy
    • Work with programme teams in Faculties and individual courses, for example through the Academic Progression Initiative and Course Design Intensives, to embed progressive development of the Information Literacy Graduate Attributes throughout the student’s experience at Oxford Brookes, ensuring the attributes are visible and clearly articulated throughout programmes
    • Teach students the skills and use of appropriate information tools needed to develop their information literacy, at all levels from induction of first-year undergraduates (for example: basic search facilities and scholarly tools of the trade, different published formats of information, interpreting reading lists), through to advanced research skills for Level 6 and Level 7 work  (for example: advanced database searching, interpreting systematic reviews, current awareness tools, using reference management software)
    • Work with academic staff and learning technologists to create courses, tutorials and learning objects in the VLE/RADAR which students can access either as part of modules or independently to develop various information literacy skills
    • Provide individual and personalised support for students and researchers at all levels – face-to-face, by phone and email – in developing their information literacy throughout their time at Oxford Brookes