History

  • Find all our books and electronic books using LibrarySearch (the search box on the Library homepage).  Search and then select Book from the Search tools menu on the left.  You can further limit your search to eBook if you only want electronic books.  More information about our electronic books can be found on the Finding e-books webpage.

    Use the shelfmarks below to find where books on particular aspects of history are kept in the Library

    Age, gender, class, poverty, race 305
    American history  973 
    American political history  320.973 
    British history  941 
    British political history 320.941 
    Church history, history of religion  230-289 
    Crime  364 
    Economic history  330.9 
    European history  940 
    Family  306.8 
    German history  943 
    German political history  320.943 
    Historiography  907.2 
    History (general)  900 
    History of medicine  610.9 
    Political history  320.9 
    Political ideologies, fascism  320.5 
    Sexuality  306.7 
    Work, labour history  331 

     

    The vast majority of modules will have a reading list, created by the module leader.  Find the reading list in the top right corner of the module on Moodle, or you can search by module name or number on the reading list homepage.   Reading lists are interactive: click on the blue online resource button to be taken straight to the ebook, webpage, article or audiovisual resource, and login to make your own notes on the readings.  Why not watch our videos which will help you get the most out of your reading list?

    History of Black, Asian and other ethnic minorities in Britain - a selection of books available in Brookes Library

    Selected anthologies of primary sources

    Databases are the academic equivalent of Google and other search engines.  Searching a database will help you find journal articles (and sometimes books, book chapters, reports and other published materials) that are scholarly, academic and peer-reviewed, and suitable for your assignments and research.

    Key databases for History

    Historical Abstracts - covers the history of the world from 1450 to the present (excluding the United States and Canada), with references to articles, books and other publications from 1950 onwards; contains quite extensive abstracts for most entries; and links to journal articles.

    JSTOR - provides an archive of full text articles from a range of academic journals. Most journals covered do not give access to issues which are less than 3-5 years old.

    Bibliography of British and Irish History - highly recommended, comprehensive database providing bibliographic details of historical writing dealing with the British Isles, and with the British Empire and Commonwealth, from 55BC to the present. It lists books, articles in books and provides links to articles in journals.

    Oxford dictionary of national biography - an illustrated collection of full text articles providing the life stories of over 55,000 people, ancient and modern, who have shaped the history of the British Isles and beyond.

    Other useful databases

    Academic Search Complete - a multi-disciplinary database offering full text access to articles from more than 5,000 journals. Useful for US history.

    Box of Broadcasts (BoB) - gives you access to thousands of recorded radio and TV programmes from an online archive. It allows users to record programmes which will then be stored on the database.

    British Library EThOSsearch across 350,000+ PhD British theses for free and download / order full text where available.

    IBSS International bibliography of the social sciences - includes aspects of social, political and economic history. 

    Web of Science (formerly known as Web of knowledge) - a large, multi-disciplinary database, including history.

    Zetoc - covers about 20,000 current journals and conference proceedings in a range of subject areas. It also includes the Zetoc Alert service which enables you to receive journal table of contents and details of newly added material matching your search criteria. 

     

    Footnotes and Bibliography: Chicago referencing style guide for History students (PDF) 

    Chicago Referencing Interactive Guide: this interactive guide takes you through the basics of Chicago referencing style at Brookes.

    Teach yourself: library guides, 'how to' videos and literature searching

    Library services for researchers - general web pages for staff and research students

    2015-2016 onwards: These are available for download by Brookes students and staff from the Past Examination Papers collection on RADAR.

    When on RADAR, log in, then select Search, enter the module name or number and limit your search to Examination papers.

    Earlier years: Printed copies are available in the Library - at Headington (Short Loan area, Level 1), Harcourt Hill (Quick Reference) and Wheatley (Short Loan).

    Please note that some exam papers are not available because they have been prohibited from publication. In particular, there are no copies of any exam papers which contain multiple choice questions.

    Bodleian Library access - dissertation students are able to use the Bodleian Library if the Bodleian has materials you need which are not held by the Oxford Brookes Library.  The Bodleian Library catalogue, SOLO, is freely available to search.  You should contact your Academic Liaison Librarian if you think you need to use the Bodleian.  Read the guide Applying for admission to the Bodleian Library first, then visit the Library to obtain an application form.

    Interlibrary loans - use the interlibrary loans service to request books, articles and other publications which the Library doesn't stock.

    Referencing - here you'll find lots of useful information about referencing, including Cite Them Right Online.  You can access a Referencing guide (Chicago style) from the History of Art Academic Skills Guide and this Chicago Referencing Interactive Guide takes you through the basics of Chicago referencing style at Brookes.

    Finding previous dissertations - use the Dissertations Location List (Word or PDF) to discover where dissertations for each subject/course are held.

    Selecting Internet sources

    There is a huge amount of information available on the Internet, from academic research to misinformation and trivia. Anybody can create their own web page and make it available on the Web. You need to be selective in the sites you choose for your academic research and evaluate them just as you would printed sources. The Library has produced two guides which can help you do this:

    • Evaluating Web Sources the Web contains good quality information as well as trivia and misinformation. You need to evaluate the sources you find before making use of them in your work. This guide considers the ABC of evaluating web sources.
    • Citing information sources and plagiarism citing (also called referencing) is an essential part of your academic work. This guide explains why you need to reference correctly and how to do it using different systems, eg Harvard (author-date).

    History gateways/search tools

    Other libraries/library catalogues

    Specific sites

    Museum/Government sites