Research Opportunities

  • Details of funding opportunities will be advertised on this page when they become available, or look at research opportunities across the whole university.


  • Department of Psychology, Health and Professional Development

    3 Year, full-time funded PhD studentship

    Project title: Self-continuity in migration: Who am I in relation to my cultural past and my cultural future?

    Eligibility: Home UK/EU applicants who must be permanently resident in UK/EU

    Closing date: 14 November 2019

    Interviews: 10 December 2019

    Start date: January 2019

    Bursary p.a: £15,009 for 3 years. 

    University fees and bench fees at the Home/EU rate will be met by the University for the 3 years of the Studentship.

     

    Supervisors: Dr. Mark Burgess and Prof. Guida de Abreu

     

     Project:

     

     “Who am I in relation to my cultural past and my cultural future”?  The notion of self and cultural continuity presupposes that individuals must understand that they both change and remain the same through time. People experience life within a network of meanings that provide context for their interpretation of who they are, how they act, and for the identities they hold. Migrating from one culture to another can involve dwelling in a new network of meanings and these can place the individual in situations where they experience uncertainty and discontinuity with their previous self-understanding and identities (O'Sullivan-Lago & Abreu, 2010).

     

     This Ph.D. research will use a first-person theory of self that recognises the extent to which people are social beings (e.g., Hermans’ dialogical-self,  Zahavi’s experiential-self). Empirical data will be collected using qualitative methods. The research will investigate experiences where migrants face new horizons of meaning that are at odds with those of their home-culture and that threaten self-continuity. These could include negotiating change from relative-restriction to relative-freedom (e.g. a woman in a cultural patriarchy who moves to an egalitarian community, or an LGBT individual who moves from a non-supportive to a supportive culture). It could also include negotiating change from feelings of relative power to relative powerlessness (e.g., a man previously considered the unquestioned head of the household, or a person with a revered role who is now simply labelled ‘refugee’).

     

     There is an additional requirement to undertake up to 6-hours undergraduate teaching/week during semesters and to participate in a teaching skills course without further remuneration.

     

     For further information contact Dr. Mark Burgess mark.burgess@brookes.ac.uk

     Requirements

    Applicants should have a first or upper second class honours degree from a Higher Education Institution in the UK or acceptable equivalent qualification in psychology or related cognate discipline (knowledge of qualitative methods is essential). EU Applicants must have a valid IELTS Academic test certificate (or equivalent) with an overall minimum score of 7.0 and no score below 6.0 issued in the last 2 years by an approved test centre.  

    How to apply:

    Applications should be sent to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk and should include an application form 
    ( http://www.hls.brookes.ac.uk/images/research/phd-studentship-application-form-jan-14.doc) and a project proposal (max 2000 words) including background, aims and an outline of how those aims will be addressed. Applicants can liaise with Dr Mark Burgess when developing their proposal.

    Completion of a DBS check is required on enrolment the cost of this will be covered by the University.

    Department of Psychology, Health and Professional Development 

    3 Year, full-time funded PhD studentship

    Project title: Mental Health Literacy in children and young people 

    Eligibility: Home UK/EU applicants who must be permanently resident in UK/EU

    Closing date: 14 November 2019

    Interviews: 10 December 2019

    Start date: January 2020 

    Bursary p.a. £15,009 for 3 years

    University fees and bench fees at the Home/EU rate will be met by the University for the 3 years of the Studentship.

     

    Supervisors:

    Professor David Foxcroft and Dr Emma Davies

    Project

    Almost a quarter of adults in England experience at least one mental disorder each year, most lifetime mental disorder arising before adulthood and with impacts across health, education, employment, relationships, violence and crime (Campion 2019). Alongside the personal impact on individuals, the World Health Organisation reports that around one trillion US dollars a year in global productivity is lost because of poor mental health (WHO 2019).  

    Prioritising childhood and adolescence is important since most lifetime mental disorder has arisen by early adulthood. Alongside this, the use of digital technology to improve mental health literacy (Jorm 2012; also see e.g. Morgan et al. 2018) and provide evidence based public mental health interventions is a priority area for further research (Campion 2019).

    This PhD studentship will focus on scoping and developing a prototype intervention for use as a public mental health intervention in settings with children and young people, for example families, schools or communities. In the Prevention Science Group at Oxford Brookes University we value the principles of co-production and employ systematic frameworks in our approach to intervention development.

    For further information contact Professor David Foxcroft (www.davidfoxcroft.com  or  david.foxcroft@brookes.ac.uk)

    Requirements:
    Applicants should have (or be expecting) a first class or upper second-class honours degree from a Higher Education Institution in the UK or acceptable equivalent qualification in psychology or related cognate discipline (knowledge of research design and qualitative research methods is essential). EU Applicants must have a valid IELTS Academic test certificate with an overall minimum score of 7.0 and no score below 6.0 issued in the last 2 years by an approved test centre. We are prepared to consider alternative acceptable evidence of English Language ability.

    There is an additional requirement to undertake up to 6 hours undergraduate teaching/week during semesters and to participate in a teaching skills course without further remuneration.

    Completion of a DBS check is required on enrolment the cost of this will be covered by the University.

    How to apply:
    Applications should be sent to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk and should include an application form
    ( http://www.hls.brookes.ac.uk/images/research/phd-studentship-application-form-jan-14.doc) and a project proposal (max 2000 words) including background, aims and an outline of how those aims will be addressed. Applicants can liaise with Professor David Foxcroft when developing their proposal.

    Department of Psychology, Health and Professional Development

    3 Year, full-time funded PhD studentship

    Project title: Development of Word Learning Heuristics in Monolingual and Bilingual Infants

    Eligibility: Home UK/EU applicants who must be permanently resident in UK/EU

    Closing date: 14 November 2019

    Interviews: 10 December 2019

    Start date: January 2020 

    Bursary p.a: £15,009 for 3 years

    University fees and bench fees at the Home/EU rate will be met by the University for the 3 years of the Studentship.

     

    Supervisors: Prof. Vincent Connelly, Dr Nayeli Gonzalez-Gomez, Dr Olivia Afonso.

    Project:

    There is ample evidence that infants utilise a range of word learning heuristics that enable them to build vocabulary. Research has suggested that many of these heuristics rely on internal constraints and biases that limit the potential referents of an unknown word or phrase, therefore, often allowing an infant to form a reliable prediction of meanings. However, at present, the vast majority of research on these heuristics is based upon monolingual infants and often investigates each heuristic in isolation.

     

    Bilingualism is particularly interesting in relation to many of these heuristics as a multilingual language environment has several key differences in comparison to a monolingual setting . In fact, the mere principle of learning two or more languages can be considered to contradict the theories of some of these heuristics. Additionally, the study of these heuristics in isolation does not present a realistic representation of how infants are exposed to information and cues in their environment (e.g., combining referential cues with syntactic cues)

     

    A PhD in this area would aim to further understanding of the development of word learning heuristics in monolingual and bilingual infants. This could include whether these populations demonstrate different patterns in the development and use of word learning heuristics, or how they combine information from different sources to form word meaning predictions. The successful applicant will be expected to design and run studies, analyse and interpret experimental data. There is an additional requirement to undertake up to 6 hours undergraduate teaching/week during semesters and to participate in a teaching skills course without further remuneration. 

    For further information contact:

     

     Dr Nayeli Gonzalez-Gomez n.gonzalez-gomez@brookes.ac.uk

     

     

     Requirements:
    Applicants should have (or be expecting) a first class or upper second class honours degree from a Higher Education Institution in the UK or acceptable equivalent qualification in psychology or related cognate discipline (knowledge of research design and statistics is essential). EU Applicants must have a valid IELTS Academic test certificate with an overall minimum score of 7.0 and no score below 6.0 issued in the last 2 years by an approved test centre. We are prepared to consider alternative acceptable evidence of English Language ability.

    How to apply:
    Applications should be sent to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk and should include an application form
    ( http://www.hls.brookes.ac.uk/images/research/phd-studentship-application-form-jan-14.doc) and a project proposal (max 2000 words) including background, aims and an outline of how those aims will be addressed. Applicants can liaise with Professor Vincent Connelly  when developing their proposal.

    Completion of a DBS check is required on enrolment the cost of this will be covered by the University.

    Department of Psychology, Health and Professional Development

    3 Year, full-time funded PhD studentship

    Project title:  How do I get past this? Understanding the relationship between perceptual judgement and movement execution

    Eligibility: Home UK/EU applicants who must be permanently resident in UK/EU

    Closing date: 14 November 2019

    Interviews: 10 December 2019

    Start date: January 2020 

    Bursary p.a: £15,009 for 3 years

    University fees and bench fees at the Home/EU rate will be met by the University for the 3 years of the Studentship.

     

    Supervisors: Dr Kate Wilmut, Dr Clare Rathbone and Professor Anna Barnett

    Project:

    Moving safely around our environment without collision or incident involves numerous complex processes including the movement we choose to make. For example, when faced with a narrow gap, can we squeeze through or should we go around? When considering factors which constrain these decisions body size is clearly important, but additional factors such as movement capabilities (Wilmut and Barnett, 2010; 2011) and emotional state (Riener et al., 2011) also play a role.   

    Wilmut, Du and Barnett (2015, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SABXFrAJtF8) further demonstrate that our judgement of what we say we would do (perception) can be different from what we actually do (action). Unpublished data from this project demonstrate that movement ability constrains action but not perception in a population with a movement difficulty. Further unpublished work, has found that state anxiety influences perception but not action in an adult population. In combination these findings highlight a complex interplay between perception and action and the factors which constrain these.

    A PhD in this area would focus on factors which mediate the relationship between perception and action. Such factors could include emotional state for different populations, the interplay between movement ability and emotion, the relationship between emotion and self-efficacy. Such a project could be carried out in children and/or adults. The successful applicant will be expected to design, run and analyse experimental data exploring motor control using motion capture equipment to measure movement. There is an additional requirement to undertake up to 6 hours undergraduate teaching/week during semesters and to participate in a teaching skills course without further remuneration. 

    For further information contact Dr Kate Wilmut: k.wilmut@brookes.ac.uk

    Requirements:
    Applicants should have (or be expecting) a first or upper second class honours degree from a Higher Education Institution in the UK or acceptable equivalent qualification in psychology or related cognate discipline (knowledge of research design and statistics is essential). EU Applicants must have a valid IELTS Academic test certificate  (or equivalent) with an overall minimum score of 7.0 and no score below 6.0 issued in the last 2 years by an approved test centre.  

    How to apply:
    Applications should be sent to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk and should include an application form                     
    ( http://www.hls.brookes.ac.uk/images/research/phd-studentship-application-form-jan-14.doc) and a project proposal (max 2000 words) including background, aims and an outline of how those aims will be addressed.  Applicants can liaise with Dr Kate Wilmut when developing their proposal. 

    Completion of a DBS check is required on enrolment the cost of this will be covered by the University.

    Department of Psychology, Health and Professional Development

    3 Year, full-time funded PhD studentship

    Project title:  Self and emotion in depression

    Eligibility: Home UK/EU applicants who must be permanently resident in UK/EU

    Closing date: 14 November 2019

    Interviews: 10 December 2019

    Start date: January 2020

    Bursary p.a. £15,009 for 3 years 

    University fees and bench fees at the Home/EU rate will be met by the University for the 3 years of the Studentship.

     

    Supervisors:  Dr Sanjay Kumar & Dr Michael Pilling

    Project:

    A range of research has indicated a bias for information associated with self in attention, perception and memory [Stole, Humphreys, Yankouskaya, & Sui (2017); Sui & Humphreys, (2015); Zhou, Guo, Ma, Zhang, Liu, Feng, Zhong (2017)]. Similar biases have also been observed with emotional stimuli. Some studies from our lab indicate that individuals show self-related bias in attention and memory and they can integrate self and positive emotion information to show even larger self-biases. In a recent study (under preparation) we have shown that individuals with depression show systematically reduced self-biases for both happy and sad emotional stimuli.

     

    The research will extend this line of investigation. The PhD candidate’s research project will investigate the role of self and emotion in biased information processing in individuals with depression using behavioural experiments, EEG/ERP and TMS.  The project will be supervised by Dr Sanjay Kumar and Dr Michael Pilling at Oxford Brookes University. The successful candidate would be expected to present at scientific meetings and publish.  There is an additional requirement to undertake up to 6 hours undergraduate teaching/week during semesters and to participate in a teaching skills course without further remuneration.

    For further information contact Dr Sanjay Kumar (skumar@brookes.ac.uk)

     

    Requirements:
    Applicants should have (or be expecting) a first class or upper second class honours degree from a Higher Education Institution in the UK or MSc or acceptable equivalent qualification in psychology or related cognate discipline (neuroscience, engineering, physics, mathematics or natural sciences). The candidate should be able to work with varied groups of patient populations, if required, and be interested in learning EEG/ERP methods.  EU Applicants must have a valid IELTS Academic test certificate with an overall minimum score of 7.0 and no score below 6.0 issued in the last 2 years by an approved test centre. We are prepared to consider alternative acceptable evidence of English Language ability.

    How to apply:
    Applications should be sent to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.ukand should include an application form
    ( http://www.hls.brookes.ac.uk/images/research/phd-studentship-application-form-jan-14.doc) and a project proposal (max 2000 words) including background, aims and an outline of how those aims will be addressed. Applicants can liaise with Dr Sanjay Kumar when developing their proposal.

    Completion of a DBS check is required on enrolment the cost of this will be covered by the University.