School of Law

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  • Research

    The School of Law comprises a number of research groups, supporting our doctoral students and encouraging wide participation both through our partnerships with other research groups, and our busy programme of conferences, research events and lectures.

    The Fundamental Rights and Equality Group (FREG) comprises academics, doctoral researchers and honorary fellows working within the fields of human rights, equality, migration and law and religion. The group provides a leading research forum in areas related to fundamental rights and equality. Hosting conferences, events and lecturers the group brings together academics, practitioners and policy makers to debate emerging research challenges. Our conception of human rights is broad - our guest speakers' topics have ranged from international environmental law to transitional justice – but what underpins the ethos of the group is consideration of the interplay between human rights and equality at domestic, European and international levels.

    The Critical Approaches to Law Research Group provides a space to study and develop multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks, using contemporary critical thought and continental philosophy, to investigate legal texts and practices. The group has particular interests in deconstructive legal theory, environmental theory and history, critical geography, aesthetics, and political economy.

    The International Law research group provides a focal point for those with interests in public international law, and has particular expertise in the law, policy and theory of trade, investment, environment and non-state actors.

    The Small Jurisdictions research group focuses on the law of small jurisdictions with a common law inheritance. The group has particular specialist expertise in Crown Dependency and British Overseas Territory Public Law, Manx Public Law and Constitutional Law, Caribbean Constitutional Law, and Caribbean Property Law.

    In a wide range of circumstances religious activity and commercial activity may overlap, leading to what Edge has called “commercial religion”. While some religions with a very significant cultural footprint in the UK do not see a harmonious linkage between the commercial and the religious, others see things rather differently.