Ideas for internationalising course content

The course content of a successfully internationalised curriculum will contain diverse perspectives on economic, political, environmental and social issues and differences in professional practices across cultures. The extent to which content is internationalised will depend on the learning outcomes of the course

An internationalised curriculum can:

  • include case studies, projects, examples from a range of different cultures;
  • include real or simulated instances of cross-cultural negotiation and communication;
  • include specific reference to intercultural issues in professional practice;
  • include investigation of professional practices in other cultures
  • include specific reference to contemporary international and local content;
  • address issues such as social justice, equity, human rights and related social and economic issues;
  • address critical global environmental issues;
  • include topics on ethical issues in globalization;
  • include accounts of the historical background to current international practices;
  • include an exploration of how knowledge may be constructed differently from culture to culture in the discipline area;
  • use a recently published, international textbook or journal articles;
  • use and analyse international case studies and international sources such as journals and conference proceedings;
  • encourages students to reflect critically on what they are learning in relation to their own cultural identity and its social construction; and
  • encourages students to reflect critically on what they are learning in relation to their own cultural and geographical context.