Progression

  • Progression will be based upon a linear model of progress through discrete levels of study. The introduction of a linear progression as opposed to our current system, will simplify the current requirements making it easier for students and staff to understand.

    We will operate two main routes of progression. The first route is for students obtaining an Honours Degree and a second route that allows alternative progression paths for students opting to exit with an interim award. In this second stream, students would be able to progress to the next level of study with fewer than the required credits for an honours degree. However, they would also be required to follow a specific exit award pathway at this point, and would not be able to move back into an honours pathway again once they had chosen the alternative pathway.

    We are also introducing the concept of "compensating pass", a widely used practice amongst other UK institutions, where credit is allowed to be awarded where a pass mark has been marginally missed, providing other elements of the year have been passed satisfactorily. There will be no award of credit for missing a pass by a large margin, not attempting a module or where other modules across the year have been failed. Compensation should be confirmed by the exam committee and would be subjected to academic judgement and relevant PSRB requirements.

    For more about compensation, please refer to the section below.

    Main components of the progression model

    • Minimum 360 credits
    • Maximum of 30 credits via compensation marks at Level 4 AND
    • Maximum of 15 credits via compensation marks at Level 5
    • Minimum 120 credits achieved at Level 6
    • PSRB requirements will apply in addition to, and when necessary supersede, the above
    • Minimum 300 credits achieved
    • Max of 30 credits can be compensated at Level 4
    • Max of 15 can be compensated at Level 5
    • Minimum 60 credits achieved at Level 6
    • PSRB requirements will apply in addition to, and when necessary supersede, the above
    • Minimum 120 credits achieved
    • Max of 30 credits can be compensated at Level 4
    • Max of 15 can be compensated at Level 5
    • PSRB requirements will apply in addition to, and when necessary supersede, the above
    • Minimum 240 credits achieved
    • Minimum 90 credits achieved at Level 5
    • Max of 30 credits can be compensated at Level 4
    • Max of 15 can be compensated at Level 5
    • PSRB requirements will apply in addition to, and when necessary supersede, the above
  • Compensation

    Compensation would be defined within regulations as “The practice of allowing marginal failure (i.e. not more than 10% below the nominal pass mark) of one or more modules, and awarding credit for them, on the basis of good overall academic performance”.

    A compensated pass mark would be recorded on a transcript, and the achieved mark would be used for the purposes of calculating a Final Degree Classification and GPA.

    A student will only be awarded a compensated pass mark for a module once they had completed a first attempt and a resit. A compensated pass will normally be awarded as an alternative to a retake of a module.

    For part-time students, a compensated mark would normally only be awarded at the completion of the level of study at which it is to be applied (i.e. if it takes 2 years to complete Level 4, compensation will only be applied at the end of the second year), but the student will know that they may be eligible for compensation on modules in their first year if they go on to pass all of the necessary elements in their second year (and vice-versa).

    Compensation will apply to compulsory modules, but it is acknowledged that some PSRB requirements may insist that certain modules cannot be compensated. This is likely to be the case where a module is the only route through which a particular programme learning outcome can be delivered. It may also be the case that a non-accredited programme is deemed to require non-compensated modules and therefore, some programme-specific progression rules may need to apply and supersede the standard university progression regulations. These exceptions will be limited in number and will be approved through QLIC (via delegated authority from the Academic Board).