Yvonne Aburrow

  • LGBT+ role models are important because otherwise people assume that everyone is heterosexual and that diversity is something that happens elsewhere.

    I work as an Application Developer in IT Services, which is a friendly and inclusive place to work.

    It is important to me to be out as bisexual because of bi invisibility and erasure. I am married to a man so people probably often assume that I am heterosexual. I have come out as bisexual and got zero reaction (which is the way I like it). I also came out to a group of colleagues in another department and the reaction there was supportive as well. I haven't come out as gender-fluid, but I imagine it's kind of obvious by the way I dress.

    LGBT+ role models are important because otherwise people assume that everyone is heterosexual and that diversity is something that happens elsewhere.

    Being out at work means you don't have to pretend to be something you are not, and if someone asks about your partner or what you do in your spare time, you don't have to make up a vague generic cover story. I am also a Pagan and it is important to me to be out about that as well, for the same set of reasons as being out as bisexual.

    Brookes is a great place to work for LGBT+ staff and students because it is committed to equality and inclusion. There are also support and policies in place for ensuring that diversity is respected.

    Brookes is one of the safest places to be openly LGBT+ that I have ever worked. That's not to say that you won't ever encounter issues, but if you do, there's support at the highest levels of the institution for fixing any problems that arise.

    I am also Casework Convenor for the Unison branch at Brookes. Unison is very supportive of LGBT+ workplace equality and the branch has a LGBT+ officer.