Other research degree opportunities

  • From time to time, opportunities to work with experienced researchers on current research projects, as part of a degree of PhD programme, become available. These research student places do not provide any funding to cover the cost of fees and stipend, and would be open to candidates who were qualified to undertake the research degree, and could fully fund the programme themselves or from another external sponsor of source.

    Any project-specific research degree opportunities that become available will be advertised here.

    If the projects listed here are not what you are looking for and you are interested in undertaking a research degree at Oxford Brookes University, visit the  Areas of research web page to find out more about the range of subject areas offered within our research communities, centres, groups, academic faculties and schools.

  • Oxford Brookes University

    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences,

     

    Department of Sport, Health Sciences and Social Work,

     

    Oxford Brookes Centre for Nutrition and Health

    Self-funded Masters (MSc) by Research Project for a one year, full-time programme

    Academic Fees:            £4,427.00 (self-funded by the candidate)

     

    Bench Fees:                 £5,000.00 (self-funded by the candidate)

     

    Closing Date:               2 August 2019, 12 noon

     

    Interview Date(s):          W/C 12 August 2019

     

    Start date:                    16 September 2019

     Project Title: The effect of diet quality, genotype and taste sensitivity in pre- and post-menopausal women

    Director of Studies and main supervisor: Dr Sarah Hillier 

     

    2nd supervisor: Dr Catherine Graham

    Eligibility: Applicants require a good Honours degree (2.1 or equivalent) in Nutrition, Human Biology or related subject. Applicants must have or be eligible for AfN registration as a Registered Associate Nutritionist (ANutr). Home UK, EU only are eligible to apply.

    Project Description:

    Over three million people suffer from osteoporosis in the UK (NHS, 2019). Diet quality, hormonal regulation and genetic predisposition have been linked to osteoporosis risk (Movassagh & Vatanparast, 2017; Trajanoska et al., 2018). In females a loss in taste sensitivity has been associated with ageing, partly due to the hormonal change as a result of menopause (Mojet, Heidema, & Christ-Hazelhof, 2003; Sergi, Bano, Pizzato, Veronese, & Manzato, 2017). This has been demonstrated with the five defined human tastes (sweet, sour, bitter, salty and umami) however there is currently no research investigating the newer researched fat taste sensitivity (Sergi et al., 2017). It is hypothesised that individuals who cannot taste fat efficiently (hyposensitive) may consume larger amounts than an average taster, impacting overall diet quality (Besnard, Passilly-Degrace, & Khan, 2016).

    Genetic predisposition to fracture risk is understood, with 15 genetic loci identified (Trajanoska et al., 2018). Personalised nutrition offers an avenue for targeted prevention of chronic disease (Ordovas, Ferguson, Tai, & Mathers, 2018). The applicability of knowledge of genetic risk to osteoporosis has not been explored.

    The aim of this project is to assess whether diet quality, genotype and taste sensitivity differ between a post-menopausal control group and post-menopausal group osteoporotic group.

    The project will be based in the Centre for Nutrition and Health at Oxford Brookes University. Oxford Brookes Centre for Nutrition and Health undertakes leading edge research focused on tackling overweight and obesity, improving glycaemic control and reducing inflammation, thereby helping to improve the health and well-being of the global population. /shssw/nutrition/research/oxbcnh/

    For further information on the project please e-mail: Dr Sarah Hillier sarahhillier@brookes.ac.uk

    How to apply:

     

    Email the Research Administrator alangford@brookes.ac.uk for an application pack. Completed application forms should be returned to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk by the deadline.

     


     

    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences,

     

    Department of Sport, Health Sciences and Social Work,

     

    Oxford Brookes Centre for Nutrition and Health

    Self-funded Masters (MSc) by Research Project for a one year, full-time programme

    Academic Fees:            £4,427.00 (self-funded by the candidate)

     

    Bench Fees:                 £5,000.00 (self-funded by the candidate)

     

    Closing Date:               2 August 2019, 12 noon

     

    Interview Date(s):          W/C 12 August 2019

     

    Start date:                    16 September 2019

    Project Title: The influence of alcohol consumption in the evening on next day cycling performance

    Director of Studies and main supervisor: Dr Alaaddine El Chab

     

    2nd supervisor: Dr Sarah Hillier

    Eligibility: Applicants require a good Honours degree (2.1 or equivalent) in Nutrition, Sports Science, or a related subject. Applicants must have or be eligible for registration as a Registered Associate Nutritionist (ANutr) or Sport and Exercise Nutritionist (SENr). Home UK, EU only are eligible to apply.

    Project Description:

     

    A feature of good quality research is that experimenters control all variables known to influence the experiment, so the changes observed are solely associated with the intervention. In sports science, the most often controlled variables during the pre-trial preparation period are physical activity, dietary intake, caffeine intake, and alcohol consumption. Research subjects are, for example, asked to avoid alcohol consumption 24 hours before experimental trials. Although there are a considerable amount of studies investigating the effect of acute ingestion of alcohol on physical performance, there is limited evidence on the effects of post-alcohol/hangover effects on aerobic performance. This project aims to examine whether aerobic exercise performance is altered the day after an evening bout of alcohol consumption. The findings of this study will guide future studies on whether alcohol consumption should be restricted 24 hours before experimental trials or allowed in an amount limited to the guidelines for the general healthy population.

    NB Please note that this is a self-funded research project, and the academic fees and bench fees must be paid for by the successful applicant.  This project is only available to applicants eligible for Home / EU fees.

    For further information on the project please e-mail: Dr Alaaddine El-Chab a.el-chab@brookes.ac.uk

    How to apply:

     

    Email the Research Administrator alangford@brookes.ac.uk for an application pack. Completed application forms should be returned to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk by the deadline.

     


     

    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences,

     

    Department of Sport, Health Sciences and Social Work,

     

    Oxford Brookes Centre for Nutrition and Health

    Self-funded Masters (MSc) by Research Project for a one year, full-time programme

    Academic Fees:            £4,427.00 (self-funded by the candidate)

     

    Bench Fees:                 £5,000.00 (self-funded by the candidate)

     

    Closing Date:               2 August 2019, 12 noon

     

    Interview Date(s):          W/C 12 August 2019

     

    Start date:                    16 September 2019

    Project Title: The influence of ten plus portions of fruit and vegetables daily on dietary intake among athletes.

    Director of Studies and main supervisor: Dr Alaaddine El Chab

     

    2nd supervisor: Dr Sarah Hillier

    Eligibility: Applicants require a good Honours degree (2.1 or equivalent) in Nutrition or a related subject. Applicants must have or be eligible for registration as a Registered Associate Nutritionist (ANutr) or Sport and Exercise Nutritionist (SENr). Home UK, EU only are eligible to apply.

    Project Description:

     

    The current UK recommended intake of fruit and vegetables is 5-a-day with one portion set at 80g. However, recent studies have shown that the optimal intake is ten portions of fruits and vegetable daily; this recommendation comes from a large study which found that those consuming ten portions of fruit and vegetables had the lowest risk of cancer, coronary heart disease, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. In addition to these health benefits, athletes are recommended to increase their fruit and vegetable intake to meet the high demands in vitamins and minerals to maintain and improve performance. However, it is still unclear whether an increase in fruit and vegetable intake would have any impact on total dietary intake. Fruit and vegetables are rich sources of fibre, which has been shown to lower appetite resulting in reduced energy intake and potentially weight loss if sustained over a long period. Studies have already shown that high fruit and vegetable intake in some subgroups of the populations, such as obese and overweight people, can help with weight reduction compared to controls. It is also unclear whether an increase in fruit and vegetable intake would have any impact on the carbohydrate, protein, and fat content of the diet. Therefore, the primary aim of the study is to examine the influence of 10 portions of fruits and vegetables daily on energy and macronutrient intake among athletes. The secondary aims will examine changes in body composition and body weight.

    For further information on the project please e-mail: Dr Alaaddine El-Chab a.el-chab@brookes.ac.uk

    How to apply:

     

    Email the Research Administrator alangford@brookes.ac.uk for an application pack. Completed application forms should be returned to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk by the deadline.

     


     

           

    Please visit the Areas of research web page to find out more about the range of subject areas offered within our research communities, centres, groups, academic faculties and schools.