Research funding opportunities

  • Full details of all funding opportunities will be advertised on this web page as and when they become available.

    If you are interested in undertaking a research degree at Oxford Brookes University, visit the Areas of research web page to find out more about the range of subject areas offered within our research communities, centres, groups, academic faculties and schools.

  • Funding opportunities for continuing research students will be advertised here when they are available.
    There are no funding opportunities available at the moment.

    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences                                                                                              

    Department of Sport, Health Science and Social Work

    Three years, full time PhD Research Studentship in Centre for Movement, Occupational and Rehabilitation Sciences

    Project Title: EPIC: Exercise, Physiology, Imaging and Cardiometabolism

    Eligibility: UK/EU

    Bursary: £14,777 (2018/2019)

    Fees: Tuition fees will be paid for by the University

    Closing Date: 09 December 2018, 5pm

    Start date: 08 April 2019

    How to apply:

    Completed application forms should be emailed to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk together with a CV.

    Requirements:

    Applicant must hold a UK/EU passport and a degree in a discipline related to the expectations of the role. For full details of entry requirements please visit the Postgraduate Courses Entry Requirements.

    Project description:

    For this studentship, the successful candidate will join a multidisciplinary research team at the Centre for Movement, Occupational and Rehabilitation Sciences (MOReS) working on a pioneering new University of Oxford study, “OxSOCRATES”, that addresses the origins of cardiovascular disease in the young and, in particular, how sedentary behaviour and obesity contribute to early disease development.

    The study is the first of its kind to be funded by the British Heart Foundation and is under the overall leadership of the Principal Investigator, Dr. Alexander Jones (Paediatric Cardiologist and Senior Clinical Scientist, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford), who brings expertise in the early cardiometabolic abnormalities of childhood that precede established adult cardiovascular disease, and works in close collaboration with Professor Helen Dawes (Director of MOReS, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University), who brings a wealth of expertise from her studies of children’s exercise physiology in the Oxfordshire region.

    The successful candidate will be expected to:

    • engage with and visit participating schools
    • provide an exercise intervention and ongoing support to participating schools
    • participate fully in relevant research activities
    • present at relevant scientific meetings and to publish their work

    Appropriate training relevant to undertaking a PhD will be provided as well as an honorary contract with Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

    Any successful candidate will be subject to a DBS search once they enrol. In view of checking procedures they will be required to exhibit specified documents: 

    https://www.gov.uk/criminal-record-check-documents

    For further information on the project please e-mail Professor Helen Dawes hdawes@brookes.ac.uk or Dr Alexander Jones alexander.jones@paediatrics.ox.ac.uk.


    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences,

    Department of Biological and Medical Sciences

    3 Year Full-time Funded Studentship

    Eligibility: Home UK/EU applicants who must be permanently resident in UK/EU

    Closing date: 3 January 2019 (midnight UK time)
    Start Date: September 2019

    Value p.a.: Bursary equivalent to RCUK national minimum stipend plus fees   (2018/19 bursary rate is £14,777)

    Project Title: Butterfly evo-devo in a conservation context: how embryos respond to pesticides and immune challenges

    Over the course of their life cycle butterflies are exposed to a range of environmental factors, which act as both inducers of phenotypic variation as well as selective agents. These factors can become stressful; extreme weather events and general climatic conditions, pesticide use, habitat fragmentation and the exposure to novel pathogens. There is a need to understand how butterflies respond these (interacting) environmental challenges, particularly during their most vulnerable and least understood life stage, the egg stage. Our previous work has shown that butterfly maternal effect genes are likely to play a key role in the embryonic response, and that these genes often show sequence variability as well as unique duplications with subsequent functional diversification. In this project we will primarily focus on the innate immune response to pathogens, and test the interaction with pesticide exposure. We will conduct experiments across the entirety of embryogenesis, and examine up- and down-regulation of genes in response to interacting stressors and explore their mode of action on embryonic development. We predict that in the earliest stages of development embryos rely on maternally provided protection, rapidly followed by protection provided by the extra-embryonic serosa, which is capable of mounting an immune response. As embryonic development progresses, an embryo will likely play a more active role in the immune response. To test for micro- and macro-evolutionary shifts in immune response during embryonic development, we will use a comparative approach using a range of techniques (e.g. RNAseq); different populations from a single species (Pararge aegeria), and different species from divergent habitats.

    Name of Director of Studies:     Dr Casper J. Breuker

    Contact: email: cbreuker@brookes.ac.uk

    As part of their Studentship, any successful applicant will be required to undertake up to 6 hours undergraduate teaching/demonstrating a week during semesters on undergraduate practicals without further remuneration. Training will be given.

    Requirements: Applicants should be of the highest quality and capable of submitting a PhD thesis within 3 years. Applicants should have a first class or upper second class (minimum 2.1) honours degree from a Higher Education Institution in the UK or an acceptable equivalent qualification. EU Applicants must have an IELTS Academic test certificate with an overall minimum score of 7.0 and no score below 6.0 issued within the last 2 years from an approved test centre. We will consider alternative acceptable evidence of English Language ability.

    Application procedure:

    Applications only to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk

    Download application form:
    (http://www.hls.brookes.ac.uk/images/research/phd-studentship-application-form-jan-14.doc)


    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences 

    Department of Biological and Medical Sciences

    3 Year, Full-time Funded Studentship

    Eligibility:                       Home UK/EU applicants who must be permanently resident in UK/EU

    Closing date:                 3 January 2019 (midnight UK time)
    Start Date:                     September 2019

    Bursary Value p.a.:        Bursary equivalent to RCUK national minimum stipend  (2018/19 bursary rate is £14,777)

    Fees:                             paid by the University

    Project Title: The interaction between butterfly wing size, shape and patterning

    Neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Autistic Spectrum Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Intellectual Disability and Developmental Language Disorder are all known to have substantial and overlapping genetic risk contributions that, presumably, affect early brain development (Newbury, Monaco, Paracchini, 2014). Recent genomic and animal studies have generated converging evidence that implicates shared pathways in synaptic function across all of these disorders (Ali Rodriguez, Joya & Hines 2018).

    In this project, you will apply cutting-edge transcriptomic methods to identify gene expression networks that underlie these disorders. You will explore temporal and spatial gene expression patterns within the developing brain and combine these with high-throughput sequencing and genotype data to generate a multi-dimensional picture of early brain development. This work will provide an essential link between gene function and sequence and will help us to understand the synaptic processes that underlie brain development and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    This is a joint project supervised by Prof. Isabel Bermudez-Diaz and Dr Dianne Newbury. Both groups have an established track record in studying synaptic receptors and gene function with a collaborative and multi-disciplinary approach. You will receive training in electrophysiological, cellular and molecular lab work as well as bioinformatic and statistical analysis methods. 

    Director of Studies (DoS):                    Dr Dianne Newbury

                                                                  Contact email: diannenewbury@brookes.ac.uk

    Second Supervisor:                               Professor Isabel Bermudez-Diaz            

    As part of their Studentship, any successful applicant will be required to undertake up to 6 hours undergraduate teaching/demonstrating a week during semesters on undergraduate practicals without further remuneration. Training will be given.

    Requirements: Applicants should be of the highest quality and capable of submitting a PhD thesis within 3 years. Applicants should have a first class or upper second class (minimum 2.1) honours degree from a Higher Education Institution in the UK or an acceptable equivalent qualification. EU Applicants must have an IELTS Academic test certificate with an overall minimum score of 7.0 and no score below 6.0 issued within the last two years from an approved test centre. We will consider alternative acceptable evidence of English Language ability.

    Application procedure:

    Applications only to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk

    Download application form:
    (http://www.hls.brookes.ac.uk/images/research/phd-studentship-application-form-jan-14.doc)


    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences 

    Department of Biological and Medical Sciences

    3 Year, Full-time, Funded Studentship

    Eligibility: Home  UK/EU applicants who must be permanently resident in UK/EU

    Closing date: 3 January 2019 (midnight UK time)
    Start Date:    September 2019

    Value p.a.:     Bursary equivalent to RCUK national minimum stipend plus fees     (2018/19 bursary rate is £14,777)

    Project Title: From genes to species: Investigating the contribution of evolutionary change in tartan to mating behaviour and reproductive isolation

    The genetic basis underlying the vast diversity observed in animal male genitalia has eluded evolutionary research for decades. Recently we uncovered a gene, tartan, that explains a large difference in organ size between two Drosophila species. This project aims to understand the evolution of tartan (trn) in the context of male genital evolution.  Specifically, in this project you will take a multidisciplinary approach, bridging behavioural genetics, high-resolution microscopy, machine-learning, neuroscience and evolutionary genomics, comprising of the following approaches:

    1)   How the evolved genetic changes in trn affect mating behaviour and genital coupling in these species. This will include setting up and video recording high-throughput behavioural experiments and manual and automated measurements of standard behavioural parameters.

    2)   The mechanisms through which these effects affect reproductive fitness. This will include the study of the neural circuitry regulating the female response to mating and how this is modified in flies mated to males carrying heterospecific alleles of trn.

    3)   The role of selection in the evolution of this gene. This will include analysis of genomic data from populations of D. simulans and D. mauritiana, as well as direct tests of selection on the species-specific tartan alleles.

    The results of this Project will provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms through which morphological changes affect behavioural phenotypes and the evolution of reproductive isolation between species and speciation more generally.

    An ideal candidate would have either a background or interest in one or more of the following: speciation, evolutionary genetics or genomics, behavioural genetics, Drosophila genetics, machine-learning.

    Director of Studies:                   Dr Maria Daniela Santos Nunes

    Contact email : Dr Maria Daniela Santos Nunes: email: msantos-nunes@brookes.ac.uk

    Second Supervisor:                   Dr Saad Arif     

    As part of their Studentship, any successful applicant will be required to undertake up to 6 hours undergraduate teaching/demonstrating a week during semesters on undergraduate practicals without further remuneration. Training will be given.

    Requirements: Applicants should be of the highest quality and capable of submitting a PhD thesis within 3 years. Applicants should have a first class or upper second class (minimum 2.1) honours degree from a Higher Education Institution in the UK or an acceptable equivalent qualification. EU Applicants must have an IELTS Academic test certificate with an overall minimum score of 7.0 and no score below 6.0 issued within the last two years from an approved test centre. We will consider alternative acceptable evidence of English Language ability.

    Application procedure:

    Applications only to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk

    Download application form:
    (http://www.hls.brookes.ac.uk/images/research/phd-studentship-application-form-jan-14.doc)


    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences 

    Department of Biological and Medical Sciences

    3 Year, Full Time, funded PhD Studentship 

    Eligibility: Home UK/EU applicants who must be permanently resident in UK/EU

    Closing date: 3 January 2019 (midnight UK time)
    Start Date: September 2019

    Value p.a.: Bursary equivalent to RCUK national minimum stipend plus fees    (2018/19 bursary rate is £14,777)

    Project Title: Building a nervous system: Analysis of transport and assembly mechanisms in synapse formation.

    In order for animals to react to an internal or external stimulus with the appropriate behaviour, the input signals need to be received, processes and transmitted correctly to the effector cells. This process is facilitated by neurons, connected by synapses to each other and e.g. muscle cells. The synapses contain vesicles filled with chemical neurotransmitters that can be released into the synaptic cleft, bind to receptors on the target cell and pass on the information. The fusion of these vesicles is highly regulated in time and space in the active zone of the synapse, an elaborate protein scaffold that forms electron dense projections of different shapes and sizes. It is thought that these dense projections provide a scaffold for the fusion machinery and physically recruit the synaptic vesicles to the active zone and guide them towards the membrane. However, despite such an important function in the regulation of neurotransmission, it is still not well understood how these dense projections are assembled, what their components are and how their shape reflects their specific function. My lab uses the well characterised nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to tackle those questions. The aim of the PhD project is to take so far uncharacterized mutants with defects in active zone formation and synaptic protein transport and characterise them by functional assays and electrophysiology as well as confocal and electron microscopy. Additionally, mass spec and RNAi screens will be used to identify new components to further understand how these specific connections between neurons are formed to build a functional nervous system.  

    Director of Studies (DoS):           Dr Maike Kittelmann    Contact email: maike.kittelmann@brookes.ac.uk

    Second Supervisor:                    Professor. Isabel Bermudez-Diaz             

    Additional Supervisor :                Professor. Alistair McGregor

    As part of their Studentship, any successful applicant will be required to undertake up to 6 hours undergraduate teaching/demonstrating a week during semesters on undergraduate practicals without further remuneration. Training will be given.

    Requirements: Applicants should be of the highest quality and capable of submitting a PhD thesis within 3 years. Applicants should have a first class or upper second class (minimum 2.1) honours degree from a Higher Education Institution in the UK or an acceptable equivalent qualification. EU Applicants must have an IELTS Academic test certificate with an overall minimum score of 7.0 and no score below 6.0 issued within the last two years from by an approved test centre. We will consider alternative acceptable evidence of English Language ability.

    Application procedure:

    Applications only to hlsapplications@brookes.ac.uk

    Download application form:
    (http://www.hls.brookes.ac.uk/images/research/phd-studentship-application-form-jan-14.doc)
     

    There are no funding opportunities available at the moment.
    There are no funding opportunities available at the moment.

    The Postgraduate Doctoral Loan scheme is available from 2018-19, and further information can be found at:

    https://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/finance/postgraduate-finance---uk-and-eu-students/postgraduate-doctoral-loans/

    • This loan is open to students who start their programme after 1st August 2018.  Students in receipt of Research Council funding cannot apply.
    • A total of £25,000 is available over the duration of a course and this will be paid annually in 3 instalments.
    • The loan will be divided equally across each year of your course.
    • Students must be registered on the Doctoral Degree and not on a Masters award to qualify.
    • Students are encouraged to apply from Year 1 as it cannot be backdated.