Print, copy and understand copyright

Where can I print, scan and copy?

You can print, scan and copy in all our libraries using a Canon Multifunctional Device (MFD). For guides and more information see Brookes Print Anywhere.

Library visitors please ask library staff for access to scan and copy.

Can I get scans of Special Collections materials?

Copyright for private study

All the guidelines below refer to copying for your own personal use, for non-commercial research or private study.

They do not apply to copying material to make it available to other people such as in teaching, coursework, publication, presentations or web sites.

For private study you may copy:

  • either one chapter from a book or 5% of a book
  • one article from one journal issue
  • up to 10 pages of one short story or poem that is included in a collection of poems or stories
  • up to 10% of a British Standard
  • two pages of a short publication that is up to 20 pages long, such as a pamphlet, short book, report or other standards
  • images, such as illustrations, photos, diagrams and other pictures
  • an A4 extract from a sheet map
  • a small excerpt from a musical work
  • a small excerpt from a film or a DVD.

Copyright for coursework

Using images in coursework and presentations

  • If you are delivering a class presentation or preparing coursework you may use any image to illustrate a point that you are making
  • If you wish to use an image which does not illustrate a point you can use
    • an image that is free to use
    • an image that you get explicit permission to use for this purpose
  • You should always include an acknowledgement of the source of the image
  • Different rules apply to work that is published. Learn more in the Moodle course, Copyright for publication.

Finding images that are free to use

There are sites on the internet containing images that can be reused. You may use these images under the terms and conditions set by their rightsowners. (Sometimes these sites will use Creative Commons licences to explain these terms.)

Examples of these sites are:

You should always include an acknowledgement of the source of the image.

Be wary

  • Only use images from websites if you are confident that the person who uploaded the image is the person who created or owns the copyright in the image.
  • Sites like Wikimedia Commons and Flickr often contain material that has been illegally copied.
  • Some non-UK websites may give copyright advice which does not apply in the UK.

Finding images for use in education

The sites below contain images which may be used for educational purposes within Oxford Brookes University. They should not be used for publications, newsletters or open web sites.

You should always include an acknowledgement of the source of the image.

Using film and video in coursework and presentations

  • You may play films, video, DVDs and television programmes in coursework and presentations to other Brookes students or staff
  • You may copy clips to show in coursework and presentations to illustrate a point
  • Clips should be short and no longer than is necessary to illustrate your points
  • You should always include an acknowledgement of the source of the clip.

Finding film and video in the Library

  • You can borrow DVDs from your Library
  • You can access, record and create playlists of thousands of recorded radio and TV programmes using Box of Broadcasts
  • You should always include an acknowledgement of the source of the clip.

Be wary

  • Only show film, video, DVDs or TV programmes to Brookes students in connection with their course
  • You must set video or clips in a context that makes it clear how it relates to a point you want to illustrate
  • You must not show film, video, DVDs or TV programmes to Brookes students for recreational purposes (unless you have obtained a licence which allows this)
  • You must not show film, video, DVDs or TV programmes to people who are not Brookes students (unless you have obtained a licence which allows this)
    • for example, people attending a public lecture, prospective students, students' parents.

Note: The advice on these web pages does not constitute formal legal advice